Diabetes management and vaccination rates in the Southeast United States, 2000 through 2007

Kelly Hardman, Kelly J. Hunt, Rickey E. Carter, Carolyn Jenkins, Rhonda Hill, Daniel T. Lackland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine trends in diabetes management, by race and sex, in the southeast United States. Design: Population-based survey. Setting: Southeast United States (ie, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee). Participants: Whites and Blacks surveyed through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System between 2000 and 2007 in the southeast United States. Main Outcome Measures: Total diabetes management included personal factors (checking blood glucose and feet), healthcare provider factors (visiting a doctor, checking hemoglobin A1c, checking feet) and vaccinations (influenza, pneumonia). Results: Vaccination levels were low throughout the study period, and a racial disparity in vaccination rates developed because trends in prevalence increased more rapidly in Whites relative to Blacks. Personal diabetes management increased significantly in all race/sex groups with greater increases in Black than White men, resulting in White men having lower point estimates of prevalence than Black men. Healthcare provider diabetes management increased significantly in all race/sex groups with the exception of Black men. Considering vaccinations together with personal and provider diabetes management criteria, diabetes management improved significantly in all race/sex groups, but remained low in 2007 (ie, 8.8%, Black women; 14.0%, White women; 11.5%, Black men; 12.8% White men). Conclusion: Emphasis should be placed on improving vaccination levels, diabetes patient self-management and provider-management in the southeast United States. Although diabetes management improved over the study time period, in 2007 the percent of individuals meeting all of the diabetes management criteria examined remained very low ranging from 8.8% in Black women to 14.0% in White women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2011

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Vaccination
Health Personnel
Foot
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Mississippi
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Self Care
Human Influenza
Blood Glucose
Pneumonia
Hemoglobins
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population
hydroquinone

Keywords

  • Diabetes management
  • Racial disparities
  • Southeast United States
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hardman, K., Hunt, K. J., Carter, R. E., Jenkins, C., Hill, R., & Lackland, D. T. (2011). Diabetes management and vaccination rates in the Southeast United States, 2000 through 2007. Ethnicity and Disease, 21(1), 13-19.

Diabetes management and vaccination rates in the Southeast United States, 2000 through 2007. / Hardman, Kelly; Hunt, Kelly J.; Carter, Rickey E.; Jenkins, Carolyn; Hill, Rhonda; Lackland, Daniel T.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 21, No. 1, 12.2011, p. 13-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hardman, K, Hunt, KJ, Carter, RE, Jenkins, C, Hill, R & Lackland, DT 2011, 'Diabetes management and vaccination rates in the Southeast United States, 2000 through 2007', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 13-19.
Hardman, Kelly ; Hunt, Kelly J. ; Carter, Rickey E. ; Jenkins, Carolyn ; Hill, Rhonda ; Lackland, Daniel T. / Diabetes management and vaccination rates in the Southeast United States, 2000 through 2007. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 13-19.
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