Diabetes is Associated with Worse Executive Function in Both Eastern and Western Populations: Shanghai Aging Study and Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

Shanghai Aging Study (SAS), Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA), V. Shane Pankratz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: It remains unknown whether the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cognitive function differs in Eastern and Western populations. This study aimed to elucidate whether DM is associated with worse cognitive performance in both populations. Methods: The Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) are two population-based studies with similar design and methodology in Shanghai, China and Rochester, MN, USA. Non-demented participants underwent cognitive testing, and DM was assessed from the medical record. Separate analyses were performed in SAS and MCSA regarding the association between DM and cognitive performance. Results: A total of 3,348 Chinese participants in the SAS and 3,734 American subjects in the MCSA were included. Compared with MCSA subjects, SAS participants were younger, less educated, and had lower frequency of vascular disease, APOE ε4 carriers and obesity. Participants withDM(compared to non-DM participants) performed significantly worse on all the cognitive domains in both the SAS and MCSA. After adjustment for age, gender, education, and vascular covariates, DM was associated with worse performance in executive function (β =-0.15, p = 0.001 for SAS, and β =-0.10, p = 0.008 for MCSA) in the total sample and in the cognitively normal sub-sample. Furthermore,DMwas associated with poor performance in visuospatial skills, language, and memory in the SAS, but not in the MCSA. Conclusions: Diabetes is associated with cognitive dysfunction and, in particular, exerts a negative impact on executive function regardless of race, age, and prevalence of vascular risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-176
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Executive Function
Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Vascular Diseases
Cognition
Medical Records
Blood Vessels
China
Language
Obesity
Education

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Cross-sectional studies
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Executive function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Diabetes is Associated with Worse Executive Function in Both Eastern and Western Populations : Shanghai Aging Study and Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. / Shanghai Aging Study (SAS); Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA); Shane Pankratz, V.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 47, No. 1, 2015, p. 167-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) ; Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) ; Shane Pankratz, V. / Diabetes is Associated with Worse Executive Function in Both Eastern and Western Populations : Shanghai Aging Study and Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 167-176.
@article{21e39b7b0cff47759b719fccd24052ac,
title = "Diabetes is Associated with Worse Executive Function in Both Eastern and Western Populations: Shanghai Aging Study and Mayo Clinic Study of Aging",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: It remains unknown whether the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cognitive function differs in Eastern and Western populations. This study aimed to elucidate whether DM is associated with worse cognitive performance in both populations. Methods: The Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) are two population-based studies with similar design and methodology in Shanghai, China and Rochester, MN, USA. Non-demented participants underwent cognitive testing, and DM was assessed from the medical record. Separate analyses were performed in SAS and MCSA regarding the association between DM and cognitive performance. Results: A total of 3,348 Chinese participants in the SAS and 3,734 American subjects in the MCSA were included. Compared with MCSA subjects, SAS participants were younger, less educated, and had lower frequency of vascular disease, APOE ε4 carriers and obesity. Participants withDM(compared to non-DM participants) performed significantly worse on all the cognitive domains in both the SAS and MCSA. After adjustment for age, gender, education, and vascular covariates, DM was associated with worse performance in executive function (β =-0.15, p = 0.001 for SAS, and β =-0.10, p = 0.008 for MCSA) in the total sample and in the cognitively normal sub-sample. Furthermore,DMwas associated with poor performance in visuospatial skills, language, and memory in the SAS, but not in the MCSA. Conclusions: Diabetes is associated with cognitive dysfunction and, in particular, exerts a negative impact on executive function regardless of race, age, and prevalence of vascular risk factors.",
keywords = "Cognition, Cross-sectional studies, Diabetes mellitus, Executive function",
author = "{Shanghai Aging Study (SAS)} and {Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA)} and Qianhua Zhao and Roberts, {Rosebud O} and Ding Ding and Ruth Cha and Qihao Guo and Haijiao Meng and {Shane Pankratz}, V. and Machulda, {Mary Margaret} and {Shane Pankratz}, V. and Bei Wang and Christianson, {Teresa J H} and Aakre, {Jeremiah A.} and Knopman, {David S} and Boeve, {Bradley F} and Zhen Hong and Petersen, {Ronald Carl}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.3233/JAD-150073",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "167--176",
journal = "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease",
issn = "1387-2877",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diabetes is Associated with Worse Executive Function in Both Eastern and Western Populations

T2 - Shanghai Aging Study and Mayo Clinic Study of Aging

AU - Shanghai Aging Study (SAS)

AU - Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA)

AU - Zhao, Qianhua

AU - Roberts, Rosebud O

AU - Ding, Ding

AU - Cha, Ruth

AU - Guo, Qihao

AU - Meng, Haijiao

AU - Shane Pankratz, V.

AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret

AU - Shane Pankratz, V.

AU - Wang, Bei

AU - Christianson, Teresa J H

AU - Aakre, Jeremiah A.

AU - Knopman, David S

AU - Boeve, Bradley F

AU - Hong, Zhen

AU - Petersen, Ronald Carl

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background and Objectives: It remains unknown whether the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cognitive function differs in Eastern and Western populations. This study aimed to elucidate whether DM is associated with worse cognitive performance in both populations. Methods: The Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) are two population-based studies with similar design and methodology in Shanghai, China and Rochester, MN, USA. Non-demented participants underwent cognitive testing, and DM was assessed from the medical record. Separate analyses were performed in SAS and MCSA regarding the association between DM and cognitive performance. Results: A total of 3,348 Chinese participants in the SAS and 3,734 American subjects in the MCSA were included. Compared with MCSA subjects, SAS participants were younger, less educated, and had lower frequency of vascular disease, APOE ε4 carriers and obesity. Participants withDM(compared to non-DM participants) performed significantly worse on all the cognitive domains in both the SAS and MCSA. After adjustment for age, gender, education, and vascular covariates, DM was associated with worse performance in executive function (β =-0.15, p = 0.001 for SAS, and β =-0.10, p = 0.008 for MCSA) in the total sample and in the cognitively normal sub-sample. Furthermore,DMwas associated with poor performance in visuospatial skills, language, and memory in the SAS, but not in the MCSA. Conclusions: Diabetes is associated with cognitive dysfunction and, in particular, exerts a negative impact on executive function regardless of race, age, and prevalence of vascular risk factors.

AB - Background and Objectives: It remains unknown whether the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cognitive function differs in Eastern and Western populations. This study aimed to elucidate whether DM is associated with worse cognitive performance in both populations. Methods: The Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) are two population-based studies with similar design and methodology in Shanghai, China and Rochester, MN, USA. Non-demented participants underwent cognitive testing, and DM was assessed from the medical record. Separate analyses were performed in SAS and MCSA regarding the association between DM and cognitive performance. Results: A total of 3,348 Chinese participants in the SAS and 3,734 American subjects in the MCSA were included. Compared with MCSA subjects, SAS participants were younger, less educated, and had lower frequency of vascular disease, APOE ε4 carriers and obesity. Participants withDM(compared to non-DM participants) performed significantly worse on all the cognitive domains in both the SAS and MCSA. After adjustment for age, gender, education, and vascular covariates, DM was associated with worse performance in executive function (β =-0.15, p = 0.001 for SAS, and β =-0.10, p = 0.008 for MCSA) in the total sample and in the cognitively normal sub-sample. Furthermore,DMwas associated with poor performance in visuospatial skills, language, and memory in the SAS, but not in the MCSA. Conclusions: Diabetes is associated with cognitive dysfunction and, in particular, exerts a negative impact on executive function regardless of race, age, and prevalence of vascular risk factors.

KW - Cognition

KW - Cross-sectional studies

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Executive function

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940906516&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940906516&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JAD-150073

DO - 10.3233/JAD-150073

M3 - Article

C2 - 26402765

AN - SCOPUS:84940906516

VL - 47

SP - 167

EP - 176

JO - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

JF - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

SN - 1387-2877

IS - 1

ER -