Development and preliminary validation of the cancer family impact scale for colorectal cancer

Pamela S. Sinicrope, Sally W. Vernon, Pamela M. Diamond, Christi Ann Patten, Steven H. Kelder, Kari G. Rabe, Gloria M Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The aim of our study was to develop a measure of how a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) affects families from the viewpoint of unaffected family members. Method: Using data from 1285 participants (637 families) in the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Genetic Testing study, we developed and validated The Cancer Family Impact Scale (CFIS), an instrument for use in studies investigating relationships among family factors and CRC prevention behaviors when family history is a risk factor. Results: Through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using a 50% random sample of participants, we identified 5 latent constructs among 18 items: (1) NEGATIVE: negative effects of cancer on the family; (2) POSITIVE: positive effects of cancer on the family; (3) COMMUNICATE: how families communicate about cancer; (4) FLOW: how information about cancer is conveyed in families; and (5) NORM: how individuals react to family norms about cancer. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the same sample showed the CFIS to have a reasonably good fit (χ2 = 389.97, degree of freedom (df ) = 122, root mean square error of approximation = 0.06 [0.05-0.07], comparative fit index = 0.90, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.88, goodness of fit index = 0.94), and findings were cross-validated on the remaining 50% of the participants. The reliability of the scale was α = 0.65. Conclusions: The CFIS could be used to clarify the role that family factors play in the association between CRC family history and CRC prevention behaviors, and also aid in the development and evaluation of family-based cancer prevention interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-169
Number of pages9
JournalGenetic Testing
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Fingerprint

Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Statistical Factor Analysis
Genetic Testing
Colonic Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Development and preliminary validation of the cancer family impact scale for colorectal cancer. / Sinicrope, Pamela S.; Vernon, Sally W.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Patten, Christi Ann; Kelder, Steven H.; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

In: Genetic Testing, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.03.2008, p. 161-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sinicrope, Pamela S. ; Vernon, Sally W. ; Diamond, Pamela M. ; Patten, Christi Ann ; Kelder, Steven H. ; Rabe, Kari G. ; Petersen, Gloria M. / Development and preliminary validation of the cancer family impact scale for colorectal cancer. In: Genetic Testing. 2008 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 161-169.
@article{ba819024cd8844bfaf85f775558dcdac,
title = "Development and preliminary validation of the cancer family impact scale for colorectal cancer",
abstract = "Aim: The aim of our study was to develop a measure of how a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) affects families from the viewpoint of unaffected family members. Method: Using data from 1285 participants (637 families) in the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Genetic Testing study, we developed and validated The Cancer Family Impact Scale (CFIS), an instrument for use in studies investigating relationships among family factors and CRC prevention behaviors when family history is a risk factor. Results: Through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using a 50{\%} random sample of participants, we identified 5 latent constructs among 18 items: (1) NEGATIVE: negative effects of cancer on the family; (2) POSITIVE: positive effects of cancer on the family; (3) COMMUNICATE: how families communicate about cancer; (4) FLOW: how information about cancer is conveyed in families; and (5) NORM: how individuals react to family norms about cancer. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the same sample showed the CFIS to have a reasonably good fit (χ2 = 389.97, degree of freedom (df ) = 122, root mean square error of approximation = 0.06 [0.05-0.07], comparative fit index = 0.90, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.88, goodness of fit index = 0.94), and findings were cross-validated on the remaining 50{\%} of the participants. The reliability of the scale was α = 0.65. Conclusions: The CFIS could be used to clarify the role that family factors play in the association between CRC family history and CRC prevention behaviors, and also aid in the development and evaluation of family-based cancer prevention interventions.",
author = "Sinicrope, {Pamela S.} and Vernon, {Sally W.} and Diamond, {Pamela M.} and Patten, {Christi Ann} and Kelder, {Steven H.} and Rabe, {Kari G.} and Petersen, {Gloria M}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/gte.2007.0077",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "161--169",
journal = "Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers",
issn = "1945-0265",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Development and preliminary validation of the cancer family impact scale for colorectal cancer

AU - Sinicrope, Pamela S.

AU - Vernon, Sally W.

AU - Diamond, Pamela M.

AU - Patten, Christi Ann

AU - Kelder, Steven H.

AU - Rabe, Kari G.

AU - Petersen, Gloria M

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - Aim: The aim of our study was to develop a measure of how a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) affects families from the viewpoint of unaffected family members. Method: Using data from 1285 participants (637 families) in the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Genetic Testing study, we developed and validated The Cancer Family Impact Scale (CFIS), an instrument for use in studies investigating relationships among family factors and CRC prevention behaviors when family history is a risk factor. Results: Through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using a 50% random sample of participants, we identified 5 latent constructs among 18 items: (1) NEGATIVE: negative effects of cancer on the family; (2) POSITIVE: positive effects of cancer on the family; (3) COMMUNICATE: how families communicate about cancer; (4) FLOW: how information about cancer is conveyed in families; and (5) NORM: how individuals react to family norms about cancer. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the same sample showed the CFIS to have a reasonably good fit (χ2 = 389.97, degree of freedom (df ) = 122, root mean square error of approximation = 0.06 [0.05-0.07], comparative fit index = 0.90, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.88, goodness of fit index = 0.94), and findings were cross-validated on the remaining 50% of the participants. The reliability of the scale was α = 0.65. Conclusions: The CFIS could be used to clarify the role that family factors play in the association between CRC family history and CRC prevention behaviors, and also aid in the development and evaluation of family-based cancer prevention interventions.

AB - Aim: The aim of our study was to develop a measure of how a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) affects families from the viewpoint of unaffected family members. Method: Using data from 1285 participants (637 families) in the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Genetic Testing study, we developed and validated The Cancer Family Impact Scale (CFIS), an instrument for use in studies investigating relationships among family factors and CRC prevention behaviors when family history is a risk factor. Results: Through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using a 50% random sample of participants, we identified 5 latent constructs among 18 items: (1) NEGATIVE: negative effects of cancer on the family; (2) POSITIVE: positive effects of cancer on the family; (3) COMMUNICATE: how families communicate about cancer; (4) FLOW: how information about cancer is conveyed in families; and (5) NORM: how individuals react to family norms about cancer. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the same sample showed the CFIS to have a reasonably good fit (χ2 = 389.97, degree of freedom (df ) = 122, root mean square error of approximation = 0.06 [0.05-0.07], comparative fit index = 0.90, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.88, goodness of fit index = 0.94), and findings were cross-validated on the remaining 50% of the participants. The reliability of the scale was α = 0.65. Conclusions: The CFIS could be used to clarify the role that family factors play in the association between CRC family history and CRC prevention behaviors, and also aid in the development and evaluation of family-based cancer prevention interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41449098460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41449098460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/gte.2007.0077

DO - 10.1089/gte.2007.0077

M3 - Article

C2 - 18373413

AN - SCOPUS:41449098460

VL - 12

SP - 161

EP - 169

JO - Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers

JF - Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers

SN - 1945-0265

IS - 1

ER -