Development and initial validation of the Obsessive Belief Questionnaire-Child Version (OBQ-CV)

Meredith E. Coles, Lidewij H. Wolters, Ingrid Sochting, Else De Haan, Ashley S. Pietrefesa, Stephen Perry Whiteside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) propose that beliefs are important in the etiology and maintenance of OCD and that these beliefs develop during childhood [Neal et al., 1991: Psychol Bull 109:400-410; Rachman, 1997: Behav Res Ther 35:793-802; Cronbach, 1951: Psychometrika 16:297-334]. However, the ability to test these predictions has been hampered by the lack of a standardized measure of OCD-related beliefs for youth. Therefore, this article presents initial data on a youth version of the widely used Obsessive Belief Questionnaire (OBQ) [Bonett, 2002: J Educ Behav Stat 27:335-340]. Methods: Data examining the psychometric properties of the Obsessive Belief Questionnaire-Child Version (OBQ-CV) are presented from two pediatric OCD samples: a North American (n=29, aged 9-17 years) and a Dutch sample (n=48, aged 8-18 years). Results: Preliminary findings from both samples support the internal consistency, retest reliability, and convergent validity of the OBQ-CV. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that the OBQ-CV is a promising tool for examining the role of cognitions in pediatric OCD. Development of the OBQ-CV to augment the existing adult version of the scale creates unique opportunities for investigating the role of cognitions in OCD across the lifespan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)982-991
Number of pages10
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Cognition
Pediatrics
Aptitude
Surveys and Questionnaires
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Beliefs
  • Children
  • Cognitions
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • OCD
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Development and initial validation of the Obsessive Belief Questionnaire-Child Version (OBQ-CV). / Coles, Meredith E.; Wolters, Lidewij H.; Sochting, Ingrid; De Haan, Else; Pietrefesa, Ashley S.; Whiteside, Stephen Perry.

In: Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 27, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 982-991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coles, Meredith E. ; Wolters, Lidewij H. ; Sochting, Ingrid ; De Haan, Else ; Pietrefesa, Ashley S. ; Whiteside, Stephen Perry. / Development and initial validation of the Obsessive Belief Questionnaire-Child Version (OBQ-CV). In: Depression and Anxiety. 2010 ; Vol. 27, No. 10. pp. 982-991.
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