Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate in human subjects by using CT

Soon Hyo Kwon, Ahmed Saad, Sandra Herrmann, Stephen C Textor, Lilach O Lerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)-derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51-73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88∗iothalamate GFR, r<sup>2</sup> = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient correlation, 0.835) but was unaffected by revascularization (mean, 25.3 mL/min ± 15.2 vs 30.3 mL/min ± 18.5; P = .097). Conclusion: CT assessments of single-kidney GFR are reproducible and agree well with a reference standard. CT can be useful to obtain minimally invasive estimates of bilateral single-kidney function in human subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-498
Number of pages9
JournalRadiology
Volume276
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

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Glomerular Filtration Rate
Tomography
Kidney
Iothalamic Acid
Renal Artery Obstruction
Linear Models
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Research Ethics Committees
Angiotensins
Nonparametric Statistics
Informed Consent
Renin
Perfusion
Sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate in human subjects by using CT. / Kwon, Soon Hyo; Saad, Ahmed; Herrmann, Sandra; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O.

In: Radiology, Vol. 276, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 490-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)-derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51-73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88∗iothalamate GFR, r2 = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient correlation, 0.835) but was unaffected by revascularization (mean, 25.3 mL/min ± 15.2 vs 30.3 mL/min ± 18.5; P = .097). Conclusion: CT assessments of single-kidney GFR are reproducible and agree well with a reference standard. CT can be useful to obtain minimally invasive estimates of bilateral single-kidney function in human subjects.",
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N2 - Purpose: To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)-derived measurements of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) obtained in human subjects with 64-section CT agree with those obtained with iothalamate clearance, a rigorous reference standard. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study, and written informed consent was obtained. Ninety-six patients (age range, 51-73 years; 46 men, 50 women) with essential (n = 56) or renovascular (n = 40) hypertension were prospectively studied in controlled conditions (involving sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade). Single-kidney perfusion, volume, and GFR were measured by using multidetector CT time-attenuation curves and were compared with GFR measured by using iothalamate clearance, as assigned to the right and left kidney according to relative volumes. The reproducibility of CT GFR over a 3-month period (n = 21) was assessed in patients with renal artery stenosis who were undergoing stable medical treatment. Statistical analysis included the t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, linear regression, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: CT GFR values were similar to those of iothalamate clearance (mean ± standard deviation, 38.2 mL/min ± 18 vs 41.6 mL/min ± 17; P = .062). Stenotic kidney CT GFR in patients with renal artery stenosis was lower than contralateral kidney GFR or essential hypertension single-kidney GFR (mean, 23.1 mL/min ± 13 vs 36.9 mL/min ± 17 [P = .0008] and 45.2 mL/min ± 16 [P = .019], respectively), as was iothalamate clearance (mean, 26.9 mL/min ± 14 vs 38.5 mL/min ± 15 [P = .0004] and 49.0 mL/min ± 14 [P = .001], respectively). CT GFR correlated well with iothalamate GFR (linear regression, CT GFR = 0.88∗iothalamate GFR, r2 = 0.89, P < .0001), and Bland-Altman analysis was used to confirm the agreement. CT GFR was also moderately reproducible in medically treated patients with renal artery stenosis (concordance coefficient correlation, 0.835) but was unaffected by revascularization (mean, 25.3 mL/min ± 15.2 vs 30.3 mL/min ± 18.5; P = .097). Conclusion: CT assessments of single-kidney GFR are reproducible and agree well with a reference standard. CT can be useful to obtain minimally invasive estimates of bilateral single-kidney function in human subjects.

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