Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry

Evan N. Nicolai, James K. Trevathan, Erika K. Ross, Jose Lujan, Charles D. Blaha, Kevin E. Bennet, Kendall H Lee, Kip A. Ludwig

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioelectronic Medicines is an emerging field that capitalizes on minimally-invasive technology to stimulate the autonomic nervous system in order to evoke therapeutic biomolecular changes at the end-organ. The goal of Bioelectronic Medicines is to realize both 'precision and personalized' medicine. 'Precise' stimulation of neural circuitry creates biomolecular changes targeted exactly where needed to maximize therapeutic effects while minimizing off-target changes associated with side-effects. The therapy is then 'personalized' by utilizing implanted sensors to measure the biomolecular concentrations at, or near, the end-organ of interest and continually adjusting therapy to account for patient-specific biological changes throughout the day. To realize the promise of Bioelectronic Medicines, there is a need for minimally invasive, real-time measurement of biomarkers associated with the effects of autonomic nerve stimulation to be used for continuous titration of therapy. In this study we examine the feasibility of using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure norepinephrine levels, a neurochemical relevant to end-organ function, directly from blood. FSCV is a well-understood method for measuring electroactive neurochemicals in the central nervous system with high temporal and high spatial resolution that has yet to be adapted to the study of the autonomic nervous system. The results demonstrate that while detecting the electroactive neurochemical norepinephrine in blood is more challenging than obtaining the same FSCV measurements in a buffer solution due to biofouling of the electrode, it is feasible to utilize a minimally invasive FSCV electrode to obtain neurochemical measurements in blood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages111-116
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781509029839
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 2017
Event12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Rochester, United States
Duration: May 7 2017May 10 2017

Other

Other12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017
CountryUnited States
CityRochester
Period5/7/175/10/17

Fingerprint

norepinephrine
Norepinephrine
medicine
Cyclic voltammetry
Medicine
blood
Neurology
autonomic nervous system
Blood
organs
therapy
Precision Medicine
Autonomic Nervous System
stimulation
Electrodes
Biofouling
Autonomic Pathways
central nervous system
electrodes
biomarkers

Keywords

  • autonomic nervous system
  • bioelectronics medicines
  • blood
  • fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV)
  • minimally invasive
  • norepinephrine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Nicolai, E. N., Trevathan, J. K., Ross, E. K., Lujan, J., Blaha, C. D., Bennet, K. E., ... Ludwig, K. A. (2017). Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry. In 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings (pp. 111-116). [7985859] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985859

Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry. / Nicolai, Evan N.; Trevathan, James K.; Ross, Erika K.; Lujan, Jose; Blaha, Charles D.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H; Ludwig, Kip A.

2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. p. 111-116 7985859.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Nicolai, EN, Trevathan, JK, Ross, EK, Lujan, J, Blaha, CD, Bennet, KE, Lee, KH & Ludwig, KA 2017, Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry. in 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings., 7985859, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 111-116, 12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017, Rochester, United States, 5/7/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985859
Nicolai EN, Trevathan JK, Ross EK, Lujan J, Blaha CD, Bennet KE et al. Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry. In 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. p. 111-116. 7985859 https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985859
Nicolai, Evan N. ; Trevathan, James K. ; Ross, Erika K. ; Lujan, Jose ; Blaha, Charles D. ; Bennet, Kevin E. ; Lee, Kendall H ; Ludwig, Kip A. / Detection of norepinephrine in whole blood via fast scan cyclic voltammetry. 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. pp. 111-116
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