Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology

Diane E. Holland, Catherine E. Vanderboom, Ann Marie Dose, Adriana M. Delgado, Christine M. Austin, Cory Ingram, Ellen M. Wild, Karen A. Monsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We used a standardized terminology to describe patient problems and the nursing care provided in a pilot study of a transitional palliative care intervention with patients and caregivers. Narrative phrases of a nurse's documentation were mapped to the Omaha System (problem, intervention, and target). Over the course of the intervention, 109 notes (1473 phrases) were documented for 9 adults discharged home (mean age, 68 years; mean number of morbid conditions, 7.1; mean number of medications, 15.4). Thirty-one of the 42 Omaha System problems were identified; the average number of problems per patient was 13. Phrases were mapped to all 4 problem domains (environmental, 2.6%; health-related behaviors, 52.3%; physiological, 30.8%; and psychosocial, 14.3%). Surveillance phrases were the most frequent (72.4%); case management phrases were at 20.9%, and teaching, guidance, and counseling phrases were at 6.7%. The number of problems documented per patient correlated with the time between the first and last notes (> = 0.76; P = .02) but not with the number of notes per patient (> = 0.51; P = .16). These results are the first to describe nursing interventions in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home with a standardized terminology. Linking interventions to patient problems is critical for describing effective strategies in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-281
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing
Terminology
Palliative Care
Case Management
Nursing Care
Documentation
Caregivers
Counseling
Teaching
Nursing
Nurses
Health

Keywords

  • Omaha System
  • Palliative care
  • Standardized terminology
  • Transitional care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Holland, D. E., Vanderboom, C. E., Dose, A. M., Delgado, A. M., Austin, C. M., Ingram, C., ... Monsen, K. A. (2017). Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, 19(3), 275-281. https://doi.org/10.1097/NJH.0000000000000342

Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology. / Holland, Diane E.; Vanderboom, Catherine E.; Dose, Ann Marie; Delgado, Adriana M.; Austin, Christine M.; Ingram, Cory; Wild, Ellen M.; Monsen, Karen A.

In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.01.2017, p. 275-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holland, DE, Vanderboom, CE, Dose, AM, Delgado, AM, Austin, CM, Ingram, C, Wild, EM & Monsen, KA 2017, 'Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology', Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 275-281. https://doi.org/10.1097/NJH.0000000000000342
Holland, Diane E. ; Vanderboom, Catherine E. ; Dose, Ann Marie ; Delgado, Adriana M. ; Austin, Christine M. ; Ingram, Cory ; Wild, Ellen M. ; Monsen, Karen A. / Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology. In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 275-281.
@article{da1fe82e634e49c6b5c2ab7ed4e9ecf9,
title = "Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology",
abstract = "We used a standardized terminology to describe patient problems and the nursing care provided in a pilot study of a transitional palliative care intervention with patients and caregivers. Narrative phrases of a nurse's documentation were mapped to the Omaha System (problem, intervention, and target). Over the course of the intervention, 109 notes (1473 phrases) were documented for 9 adults discharged home (mean age, 68 years; mean number of morbid conditions, 7.1; mean number of medications, 15.4). Thirty-one of the 42 Omaha System problems were identified; the average number of problems per patient was 13. Phrases were mapped to all 4 problem domains (environmental, 2.6{\%}; health-related behaviors, 52.3{\%}; physiological, 30.8{\%}; and psychosocial, 14.3{\%}). Surveillance phrases were the most frequent (72.4{\%}); case management phrases were at 20.9{\%}, and teaching, guidance, and counseling phrases were at 6.7{\%}. The number of problems documented per patient correlated with the time between the first and last notes (> = 0.76; P = .02) but not with the number of notes per patient (> = 0.51; P = .16). These results are the first to describe nursing interventions in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home with a standardized terminology. Linking interventions to patient problems is critical for describing effective strategies in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home.",
keywords = "Omaha System, Palliative care, Standardized terminology, Transitional care",
author = "Holland, {Diane E.} and Vanderboom, {Catherine E.} and Dose, {Ann Marie} and Delgado, {Adriana M.} and Austin, {Christine M.} and Cory Ingram and Wild, {Ellen M.} and Monsen, {Karen A.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/NJH.0000000000000342",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "275--281",
journal = "Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing",
issn = "1522-2179",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Describing transitional palliative nursing care using a standardized terminology

AU - Holland, Diane E.

AU - Vanderboom, Catherine E.

AU - Dose, Ann Marie

AU - Delgado, Adriana M.

AU - Austin, Christine M.

AU - Ingram, Cory

AU - Wild, Ellen M.

AU - Monsen, Karen A.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - We used a standardized terminology to describe patient problems and the nursing care provided in a pilot study of a transitional palliative care intervention with patients and caregivers. Narrative phrases of a nurse's documentation were mapped to the Omaha System (problem, intervention, and target). Over the course of the intervention, 109 notes (1473 phrases) were documented for 9 adults discharged home (mean age, 68 years; mean number of morbid conditions, 7.1; mean number of medications, 15.4). Thirty-one of the 42 Omaha System problems were identified; the average number of problems per patient was 13. Phrases were mapped to all 4 problem domains (environmental, 2.6%; health-related behaviors, 52.3%; physiological, 30.8%; and psychosocial, 14.3%). Surveillance phrases were the most frequent (72.4%); case management phrases were at 20.9%, and teaching, guidance, and counseling phrases were at 6.7%. The number of problems documented per patient correlated with the time between the first and last notes (> = 0.76; P = .02) but not with the number of notes per patient (> = 0.51; P = .16). These results are the first to describe nursing interventions in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home with a standardized terminology. Linking interventions to patient problems is critical for describing effective strategies in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home.

AB - We used a standardized terminology to describe patient problems and the nursing care provided in a pilot study of a transitional palliative care intervention with patients and caregivers. Narrative phrases of a nurse's documentation were mapped to the Omaha System (problem, intervention, and target). Over the course of the intervention, 109 notes (1473 phrases) were documented for 9 adults discharged home (mean age, 68 years; mean number of morbid conditions, 7.1; mean number of medications, 15.4). Thirty-one of the 42 Omaha System problems were identified; the average number of problems per patient was 13. Phrases were mapped to all 4 problem domains (environmental, 2.6%; health-related behaviors, 52.3%; physiological, 30.8%; and psychosocial, 14.3%). Surveillance phrases were the most frequent (72.4%); case management phrases were at 20.9%, and teaching, guidance, and counseling phrases were at 6.7%. The number of problems documented per patient correlated with the time between the first and last notes (> = 0.76; P = .02) but not with the number of notes per patient (> = 0.51; P = .16). These results are the first to describe nursing interventions in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home with a standardized terminology. Linking interventions to patient problems is critical for describing effective strategies in transitioning palliative care from hospital to home.

KW - Omaha System

KW - Palliative care

KW - Standardized terminology

KW - Transitional care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020305025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020305025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000342

DO - 10.1097/NJH.0000000000000342

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85020305025

VL - 19

SP - 275

EP - 281

JO - Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing

JF - Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing

SN - 1522-2179

IS - 3

ER -