Depressive symptoms and life satisfaction in patients with multiple system atrophy

Lisa M. Benrud-Larson, Paola Sandroni, Anette Schrag, Phillip Anson Low

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extrapyramidal signs, prominent autonomic failure, and a poor prognosis. In the absence of restorative treatment, management is aimed at improving quality of life. Little is known about modifiable factors, such as depression, that may affect quality of life in MSA. The present study investigated the rate of depressive symptoms and their relationship to life satisfaction in patients with MSA. Ninety-nine patients with MSA (54% women; mean age, 67.8 ± 8.8) completed measures of depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, physical function, and disease and demographic factors. Objective autonomic indices were abstracted from the medical chart. Participants reported a high rate of depressive symptoms, with 39% endorsing moderate to severe depressive symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI ≥ 7). Reported life satisfaction was low, with a mean of 38.8 on a 100-point visual analogue scale (0 = Extremely Dissatisfied, 100 = Extremely Satisfied). The SF-36 Physical Component Scale was approximately 1.5 standard deviations below the mean of a normative sample of healthy adults the same age. Regression analysis revealed that autonomic disease parameters accounted for 22% of the variance in life satisfaction. Physical function did not account for any additional variance; however, depressive symptoms accounted for an additional 15%. Depressive symptoms are common, often severe, and an important determinant of life satisfaction in patients with MSA. Adequate treatment of comorbid depression may improve quality of life in this population, despite the presence of other debilitating deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-957
Number of pages7
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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Multiple System Atrophy
Patient Satisfaction
Depression
Quality of Life
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases
Visual Analog Scale
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Regression Analysis
Demography
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Life satisfaction
  • Multiple system atrophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Depressive symptoms and life satisfaction in patients with multiple system atrophy. / Benrud-Larson, Lisa M.; Sandroni, Paola; Schrag, Anette; Low, Phillip Anson.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 20, No. 8, 08.2005, p. 951-957.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benrud-Larson, Lisa M. ; Sandroni, Paola ; Schrag, Anette ; Low, Phillip Anson. / Depressive symptoms and life satisfaction in patients with multiple system atrophy. In: Movement Disorders. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 951-957.
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