Depression, smoking, activity level, and health status: Pretreatment predictors of attrition in obesity treatment

Matthew M Clark, Raymond Niaura, Teresa K. King, Vincent Pera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consistent predictors of attrition in obesity treatment have not been identified. This study examined whether pretreatment psychological and health behavior variables would predict attrition from a 26 week clinical multidisciplinary VLCD and behavior therapy program. Higher levels of depression, current smoking, being sedentary, and having nontreated high blood pressure were associated with treatment attrition. Thus, a biopsychosocial assessment which evaluates medical and psychiatric status may help clinicians to identify individuals at high risk for attrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-513
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Behavior Therapy
Health Behavior
Blood pressure
Health Status
Psychiatry
Obesity
Smoking
Health
Depression
Psychology
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Depression, smoking, activity level, and health status : Pretreatment predictors of attrition in obesity treatment. / Clark, Matthew M; Niaura, Raymond; King, Teresa K.; Pera, Vincent.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 21, No. 4, 08.07.1996, p. 509-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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