Depression, anxiety, and regret before and after testing to estimate uveal melanoma prognosis

Isabel Schuermeyer, Anca Maican, Richard Sharp, James Bena, Pierre L. Triozzi, Arun D. Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, longitudinal assessment of depression, anxiety, and decision regret (a sense of disappointment or dissatisfaction in the decision) in patients undergoing prognostication for uveal melanoma does not exist. OBJECTIVE To report on depression, anxiety, and decision regret before and after testing to estimate uveal melanoma prognosis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective interventional case series conducted at an institutional referral practice of 96 patients with clinical diagnosis of uveal melanoma who underwent prognostication at the time of primary therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Depression, anxiety, and decision regret prior to prognostication (baseline) and at 3 and 12 months afterwards. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Decision Regret Scale were self-administered by the patients prior to prognostication (baseline) and at 3 and 12 months afterwards. Data were summarized using means and standard deviations for continuous measures, frequencies, and percentages for categorical factors. A mixed model was used to assess the trajectory of HADS anxiety and the associations between HADS anxiety and baseline HADS depression, baseline decision regret, prognostication test result, and adjuvant therapy, respectively, while adjusting for age and sex. RESULTS Ninety-six patients (median age 60.7 years) completed baseline questionnaires. The mean (SD) HADS anxiety score at baseline (7.4 [4.0]) was higher than at 3 months (5.4 [3.7]; P < .001) or 12 months (4.7 [3.4]; P < .001), and decreased with older age (coefficient estimate [SD], -0.06 [0.02]; P < .001). The decision regret score was associated with baseline HADS depression score (coefficient estimate [SE], -1.17 [0.43]; P < .007), and HADS depression score increased with baseline HADS anxiety score (coefficient estimate [SE], 0.39 [0.06]; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our study raises questions about decision regret in patients who agree to have a prognostic test that may not help guide treatment. Although decision regret appears to lessen or dissipate with time, study on larger numbers of patients is necessary to elucidate factors that may be addressed to mitigate decision regret.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-56
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA Ophthalmology
Volume134
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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