Deposition of amyloid proteins in the epicardial coronary arteries of 58 patients with primary systemic amyloidosis

Christopher M. Wittich, Michelle A. Neben-Wittich, Paul Mueller, Morie Gertz, William D. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We sought to determine the distribution and the effect of amyloid on epicardial coronary arteries in patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Methods: We reviewed pathologic specimens taken after autopsy or cardiac transplantation from 58 patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Patients were seen from 1981 to 2000. Multiple sections of epicardial coronary arteries (left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and right coronary artery) were examined to determine the degree of amyloid deposition in the intima, media, adventitia, and vasa vasorum (vasa vasorum are nutrient arteries for the coronary arteries themselves). Results: In 56 of 58 patients (97%), amyloid was present in epicardial coronary arteries. Amyloid was identified in all artery layers (intima, media, and adventitia), and more patients had amyloid in the adventitia. However, amyloid did not cause intraluminal obstruction of epicardial coronary arteries in any patient. The vasa vasorum had considerable deposits and, in many patients, were obstructed by amyloid. Patients with obstruction of the vasa vasorum were significantly more likely to have obstructive intramural coronary amyloidosis than patients without vasa vasorum obstruction (P=.002). Conclusions: The epicardial coronary arteries of patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis had extensive amyloid deposition. This deposition, however, did not lead to obstruction of epicardial coronary arteries and therefore did not contribute to ischemic syndromes observed in these patients. Obstruction of the vasa vasorum was associated with obstructive intramural coronary amyloidosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-78
Number of pages4
JournalCardiovascular Pathology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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Amyloidogenic Proteins
Coronary Vessels
Vasa Vasorum
Amyloid
Adventitia
Arteries
Amyloidosis
Primary amyloidosis
Heart Transplantation
Autopsy

Keywords

  • Amyloidosis
  • Coronary artery
  • Pathology
  • Vasa vasorum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Deposition of amyloid proteins in the epicardial coronary arteries of 58 patients with primary systemic amyloidosis. / Wittich, Christopher M.; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Mueller, Paul; Gertz, Morie; Edwards, William D.

In: Cardiovascular Pathology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.03.2007, p. 75-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wittich, Christopher M. ; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A. ; Mueller, Paul ; Gertz, Morie ; Edwards, William D. / Deposition of amyloid proteins in the epicardial coronary arteries of 58 patients with primary systemic amyloidosis. In: Cardiovascular Pathology. 2007 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 75-78.
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AB - Introduction: We sought to determine the distribution and the effect of amyloid on epicardial coronary arteries in patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Methods: We reviewed pathologic specimens taken after autopsy or cardiac transplantation from 58 patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis. Patients were seen from 1981 to 2000. Multiple sections of epicardial coronary arteries (left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery, and right coronary artery) were examined to determine the degree of amyloid deposition in the intima, media, adventitia, and vasa vasorum (vasa vasorum are nutrient arteries for the coronary arteries themselves). Results: In 56 of 58 patients (97%), amyloid was present in epicardial coronary arteries. Amyloid was identified in all artery layers (intima, media, and adventitia), and more patients had amyloid in the adventitia. However, amyloid did not cause intraluminal obstruction of epicardial coronary arteries in any patient. The vasa vasorum had considerable deposits and, in many patients, were obstructed by amyloid. Patients with obstruction of the vasa vasorum were significantly more likely to have obstructive intramural coronary amyloidosis than patients without vasa vasorum obstruction (P=.002). Conclusions: The epicardial coronary arteries of patients with primary cardiac amyloidosis had extensive amyloid deposition. This deposition, however, did not lead to obstruction of epicardial coronary arteries and therefore did not contribute to ischemic syndromes observed in these patients. Obstruction of the vasa vasorum was associated with obstructive intramural coronary amyloidosis.

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