Demographic and co-morbid predictors of stress (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy

Abdulrahman M. El-Sayed, Waleed Brinjikji, Samer Salka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the epidemiology of stress (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (SC). We used a 3-arm case-control study to assess differences in demographic and co-morbid predictors of SC compared to orthopedic controls and myocardial infarction (MI) controls to characterize (1) population-level predictors of SC generally and (2) differences and similarities in determinants of SC compared to MI. We included data on all discharges of patients diagnosed with SC from the 2008 to 2009 National Inpatient Samples and randomly selected 1-to-1 age-matched controls from patients hospitalized with MI and patients hospitalized with joint injuries after trauma. We used McNemar tests to assess differences in demographic characteristics and co-morbidities between patients with SC and controls. There were 24,701 patients with SC in our study. Of patients with SC, 89.0% were women compared to 38.9% of patients with MI and 55.7% of orthopedic controls. Patients with SC were more likely to be white and to reside in wealthier ZIP codes compared to MI and orthopedic controls. Patients with SC were less likely to have cardiovascular risk factors compared to MI and orthopedic controls but were more likely to have had histories of cerebrovascular accidents, drug abuse, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, malignancy, chronic liver disease, and sepsis. In conclusion, demographic and co-morbid predictors of SC differ substantially from those of MI and may be of interest to providers when diagnosing SC. Several co-morbid risk factors predictive of SC may operate by increased catecholamines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1368-1372
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume110
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy
Demography
Myocardial Infarction
Orthopedics
Patient Discharge
Wounds and Injuries
Anxiety Disorders
Mood Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Demographic and co-morbid predictors of stress (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy. / El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Salka, Samer.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 110, No. 9, 01.10.2012, p. 1368-1372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M. ; Brinjikji, Waleed ; Salka, Samer. / Demographic and co-morbid predictors of stress (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2012 ; Vol. 110, No. 9. pp. 1368-1372.
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