Delayed-onset symptomatic hyphema after ab interno trabeculotomy surgery

Yachna Ahuja, Mehrdad Malihi, Arthur J Sit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe patients who have experienced delayed-onset hyphema after ab interno trabeculotomy surgery with the Trabectome (Neomedix Corp) for open-angle glaucoma. Design: Retrospective case series. Methods: study population: Patients at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, who underwent Trabectome surgery between September 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, and who had symptomatic hyphema at least 2 months after surgery. observation procedure: Patients with blurred vision at least 2 months after Trabectome surgery were examined for the presence of hyphema using a slit lamp and gonioscopy. main outcome measures: Proportion of patients experiencing delayed-onset symptomatic hyphema after Trabectome surgery. Associated factors and clinical course for these patients. Results: Of 262 cases of Trabectome surgery, there were 12 cases of delayed-onset symptomatic hyphema (4.6%). The average age was 74.3 years (range, 66 to 82 years). Median time to onset of hyphema was 8.6 months (range, 2 to 31 months) after surgery. Symptom onset commonly occurred on awakening. The most common characteristic was maintaining a sleep position on the surgical side. Most hyphemas resolved within 1 to 2 weeks, except in 1 patient, who required trabeculectomy for a refractory intraocular pressure spike. Conclusions: This is a series of patients with symptomatic delayed-onset hyphema after Trabectome surgery in the absence of further surgeries or trauma. Likely mechanisms are exertion-related increase in episcleral venous pressure or ocular compression from sleeping on the surgical side, followed by sudden decompression and blood reflux. Symptomatic patients should identify and avoid associated triggers because delayed-onset hyphema may be associated with intermittent intraocular pressure spikes that may require medical or surgical treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume154
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Hyphema
Trabeculectomy
Intraocular Pressure
Gonioscopy
Venous Pressure
Open Angle Glaucoma
Decompression
Sleep
Observation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Delayed-onset symptomatic hyphema after ab interno trabeculotomy surgery. / Ahuja, Yachna; Malihi, Mehrdad; Sit, Arthur J.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 154, No. 3, 09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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