Deception by applicants to family practice residencies

M. Grover, F. Dharamshi, C. Goveia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Our residency program experienced applicants who actively misrepresented qualifications, background, or abilities. The experiences of other family practice residencies were unknown. This study 1) determined what information family practice residency directors required from applicants, 2) assessed whether this information was confirmed or verified, and 3) describes the deceptive application information discovered by program directors. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to directors of all accredited family practice residencies. Information was collected about required information, data confirmation, and the deception and misrepresentation perceived. Results: Thirty-two percent of the directors responded. Eight of 13 items on the Electronic Residency Application System were designated as required by more than half of responding directors. Only two of the items (licensure and certain facts in the personal statement) were confirmed by a majority of directors who required them. Deception was recognized by nearly half of respondents within the past 5 years. Most cases involved specialty choice or the personal statement of candidates and were recognized during the interview or by direct confirmation of data. Conclusions: Most directors appear to accept application information at face value. Recognition of deception about application information was reported. Misrepresentation by applicants may be a more common event than previously realized and may require more thorough verification of application credentials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-446
Number of pages6
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume33
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Practice
Deception
Internship and Residency
Aptitude
Licensure
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Grover, M., Dharamshi, F., & Goveia, C. (2001). Deception by applicants to family practice residencies. Family Medicine, 33(6), 441-446.

Deception by applicants to family practice residencies. / Grover, M.; Dharamshi, F.; Goveia, C.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 6, 2001, p. 441-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grover, M, Dharamshi, F & Goveia, C 2001, 'Deception by applicants to family practice residencies', Family Medicine, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 441-446.
Grover M, Dharamshi F, Goveia C. Deception by applicants to family practice residencies. Family Medicine. 2001;33(6):441-446.
Grover, M. ; Dharamshi, F. ; Goveia, C. / Deception by applicants to family practice residencies. In: Family Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 441-446.
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