Deceased donor kidney transplantation from donors with acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis: Brief communication

K. L. Mekeel, A. A. Moss, D. C. Mulligan, Harini M Chakkera, K. Hamawi, M. J. Mazur, R. L. Heilman, Kunam Sudhakar Reddy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the current shortage of solid organs for transplant, the transplant community continues to look for ways to increase the number of organ donors, including extending the criteria for donation. In rhabdomyolysis, the byproducts of skeletal muscle breakdown leak into the circulation resulting in acute renal failure in up to 30% of patients. In nonbrain dead patients, this condition is reversible and most patients recover full renal function. Seven potential donors had rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure as evidenced by the presence of urine hemoglobin, plasma creatinine kinase levels of greater than five times the normal and elevated creatinine. One donor required dialysis. At our institution, 10 kidneys were transplanted from the seven donors. Two grafts had immediate function, five grafts experienced slow graft function and three grafts had delayed graft function requiring hemodialysis. At a mean of 8.7 months posttransplant (2.4-25.2 months), all patients have good graft function, are off dialysis and have a mean creatinine of 1.3 (0.7-1.8). In conclusion, our experience suggests that rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure should not be a contraindication for donation, although recipients may experience slow or delayed graft function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1666-1670
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Rhabdomyolysis
Acute Kidney Injury
Kidney Transplantation
Communication
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Delayed Graft Function
Creatinine
Dialysis
Kidney
Renal Dialysis
Hemoglobins
Skeletal Muscle
Phosphotransferases
Urine

Keywords

  • Acute renal failure
  • Extended criteria donors
  • Kidney transplant
  • Rhabdomyolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Deceased donor kidney transplantation from donors with acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis : Brief communication. / Mekeel, K. L.; Moss, A. A.; Mulligan, D. C.; Chakkera, Harini M; Hamawi, K.; Mazur, M. J.; Heilman, R. L.; Reddy, Kunam Sudhakar.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 9, No. 7, 07.2009, p. 1666-1670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mekeel, K. L. ; Moss, A. A. ; Mulligan, D. C. ; Chakkera, Harini M ; Hamawi, K. ; Mazur, M. J. ; Heilman, R. L. ; Reddy, Kunam Sudhakar. / Deceased donor kidney transplantation from donors with acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis : Brief communication. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2009 ; Vol. 9, No. 7. pp. 1666-1670.
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