Damage to hair follicles by normal-mode ruby laser pulses

Melanie C. Grossman, Christine Dierickx, William Farinelli, Thomas J Flotte, R. Rox Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

318 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although many temporary treatments exist for hirsutism and hypertrichosis, a practical and permanent hair removal treatment is needed. Objective: Our purpose was to study the use of normal-mode ruby laser pulses (694 nm, 270 μsec, 6 mm beam diameter) for hair follicle destruction by selective photothermolysis. Methods: Histologically assessed damage in ex vivo black-haired dog skin after the use of different laser fluences was used to design a human study; 13 volunteers with brown or black hair were exposed to normal-mode ruby laser pulses at fluences of 30 to 60 J/cm 2, delivered to both shaved and wax-epilated skin sites. An optical delivery device designed to maximize light delivery to the reticular dermis was used. Hair regrowth was assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after exposure by counting terminal hairs. Results: Fluence-dependent selective thermal injury to follicles was observed histologically. There was a significant delay in hair growth in all subjects at all laser-treated sites compared with the unexposed shaven and epilated control sites. At 6 months, there was significant hair loss only in the areas shaved before treatment at the highest fluence. At 6 months, four subjects had less than 50% regrowth, two of whom showed no change between 3 and 6 months. Transient pigmentary changes were observed; there was no scarring. Conclusion: Selective photothermolysis of hair follicles with the normal- mode ruby laser produces a growth delay consistent with induction of prolonged telogen with apparently permanent hair removal in some cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-894
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Hair Follicle
Solid-State Lasers
Hair
Hair Removal
Lasers
Hypertrichosis
Hirsutism
Optical Devices
Skin
Waxes
Alopecia
Dermis
Growth
Cicatrix
Volunteers
Therapeutics
Hot Temperature
Dogs
Light
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Damage to hair follicles by normal-mode ruby laser pulses. / Grossman, Melanie C.; Dierickx, Christine; Farinelli, William; Flotte, Thomas J; Anderson, R. Rox.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 35, No. 6, 12.1996, p. 889-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grossman, Melanie C. ; Dierickx, Christine ; Farinelli, William ; Flotte, Thomas J ; Anderson, R. Rox. / Damage to hair follicles by normal-mode ruby laser pulses. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 1996 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 889-894.
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