Cytotoxicity of Local Anesthetics in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Tao Wu, Jay Smith, Hai Nie, Zhen Wang, Patricia J. Erwin, Andre J van Wijnen, Wenchun Qu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell therapy based on the trophic, mitogenic, and immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem cells is a promising treatment modality for degenerative musculoskeletal conditions. Local anesthetics have been commonly used in interventional procedures for alleviating pain, but local anesthetics may have negative impact on MSC dosing because of cytotoxicity or other biological effects. Because previous studies have not reached consensus yet on the potential complications of local anesthetics in cell therapy, we reviewed 11 studies that involve in vitro experimentation with MSCs using aminoamide-type anesthetics including lidocaine, ropivacaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, articaine, and prilocaine. Three studies that compare the effects of different types of local anesthetic agents showed that ropivacaine has the least detrimental effects on mesenchymal stem cell populations, whereas lidocaine seems to have the most significant effects on stem cell viability. Concentration-and time-dependent effects on cell viability were reported with bupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine. We conclude that local anesthetic agents have time-and concentration-dependent detrimental effects on MSCs. However, in vivo studies will be required to understand the interactions of these agents with MSCs, because in vitro studies cannot replicate the pharmacokinetics of anesthetics in vivo or the recovery of MSCs in a more physiological environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-55
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Local Anesthetics
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Anesthetics
Lidocaine
Mepivacaine
Bupivacaine
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Cell Survival
Carticaine
Prilocaine
Consensus
Stem Cells
Pharmacokinetics
Pain
Population
ropivacaine
In Vitro Techniques
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cytotoxicity
  • Intervertebral Disk
  • Knee
  • Lidocaine
  • Local Anesthetic
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Stem Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Cytotoxicity of Local Anesthetics in Mesenchymal Stem Cells. / Wu, Tao; Smith, Jay; Nie, Hai; Wang, Zhen; Erwin, Patricia J.; van Wijnen, Andre J; Qu, Wenchun.

In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 50-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wu, Tao ; Smith, Jay ; Nie, Hai ; Wang, Zhen ; Erwin, Patricia J. ; van Wijnen, Andre J ; Qu, Wenchun. / Cytotoxicity of Local Anesthetics in Mesenchymal Stem Cells. In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2018 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 50-55.
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