Cytoskeletal alterations that confer resistance to Anti-tubulin chemotherapeutics

Arun Kanakkanthara, Paul H. Teesdale-Spittle, John H. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drugs that target microtubules are a successful class of anti-cancer agents that have been in clinical use for over two decades. Acquired resistance to these drugs, however, remains a serious problem. Microtubule alterations, such as tubulin mutations and altered β- tubulin isotype expression, are prominent factors in development of resistance. Changes in actin and intermediate filament proteins can also mediate sensitivity to microtubule-targeting drugs. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which alterations in cytoskeletal proteins lead to drug resistance. This information will be helpful for improving the targeting of microtubule toxins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-158
Number of pages12
JournalAnti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tubulin
Microtubules
Drug Resistance
Intermediate Filament Proteins
Cytoskeletal Proteins
Drug Delivery Systems
Actin Cytoskeleton
Mutation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Actin
  • Cytoskeleton
  • Drug resistance
  • Intermediate filament
  • MDR
  • Microtubule
  • Microtubule-targeting drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Cytoskeletal alterations that confer resistance to Anti-tubulin chemotherapeutics. / Kanakkanthara, Arun; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H.; Miller, John H.

In: Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 147-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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