Cytogenetic and loss of heterozygosity studies in ependymomas, pilocytic astrocytomas, and oligodendrogliomas

David T. Ransom, Steve R. Ritland, David W. Kimmel, Cheryl A. Moertel, Richard J. Dahl, Bernd W. Scheithauer, Patrick J. Kelly, Robert B. Jenkins

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161 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cytogenetic and/or loss of heterozygosity studies were performed on 13 ependymomas, 11 pilocytic astrocytomas, and 18 oligodendrogliomas. Loss of chromosome 22 was the most frequent genetic abnormality among the ependymomas. We found no consistent genetic abnormality in pilocytic astrocytomas. The most common genetic abnormality in oligodendrogliomas was loss of a portion of chromosome 19. Each informative oligodendroglioma had loss of alleles mapped to the long arm (q) of chromosome 19. One oligodendroglioma had an apparent homozygous deletion of the D19S8 locus. Our results, when combined with those in the literature, indicate that chromosomes 9, 11, and 22 may harbor genes important for the pathogenesis of ependymomas and that 19q probably harbors a gene important for the pathogenesis of oligodendrogliomas. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-356
Number of pages9
JournalGenes, Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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    Ransom, D. T., Ritland, S. R., Kimmel, D. W., Moertel, C. A., Dahl, R. J., Scheithauer, B. W., Kelly, P. J., & Jenkins, R. B. (1992). Cytogenetic and loss of heterozygosity studies in ependymomas, pilocytic astrocytomas, and oligodendrogliomas. Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, 5(4), 348-356. https://doi.org/10.1002/gcc.2870050411