Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to dysmotility and enhanced excitability of myenteric AH neurones in the inflamed guinea pig distal colon

David R Linden, Keith A. Sharkey, Winnie Ho, Gary M. Mawe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in guinea pig is associated with hyperexcitability of myenteric AH neurones, enhanced synaptic activity in the myenteric plexus, increased serotonin (5-HT) availability in the mucosa, and decreased propulsive motor activity. The current study tested the hypothesis that the activation of cyclooxygenase (COX) contributes to these alterations in bowel functions. DFU inhibition of COX-2, but not SC-560 inhibition of COX-1, restored to normal levels the electrical properties of myenteric AH neurones, the proportion of S neurones exhibiting slow EPSPs, and the rate of propulsive motor activity. Neither inhibitor was effective in altering the level of inflammation, the increased availability of mucosal 5-HT, or the enhanced fast EPSPs in myenteric AH and S neurones. COX-2 expression is enhanced in the myenteric plexus and cells within the smooth muscle layers during colitis, possibly reflecting the site at which COX-2 inhibition acts to allow recovery of motor function. In support of this concept, COX-1, but not COX-2, inhibition was effective in restoring normal mucosal prostaglandin levels. These results indicate that the various changes that occur in the motor neural pathways of the distal colon in TNBS-induced colitis do not involve a single neuroimmune mechanism. COX-2 activation is a critical step in the enhanced excitability of AH neurones as well as diminished propulsive motility in TNBS colitis, whereas other yet to be resolved pathways, that do not involve COX-1 or COX-2 activation, lead to altered 5-HT content in the mucosa and an augmentation of fast EPSPs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-205
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume557
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cyclooxygenase 2
Guinea Pigs
Colon
Trinitrobenzenes
Colitis
Neurons
Cyclooxygenase 1
Sulfonic Acids
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
Serotonin
Myenteric Plexus
Mucous Membrane
Motor Activity
Neuroimmunomodulation
Efferent Pathways
Neural Pathways
Recovery of Function
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Prostaglandins
Smooth Muscle Myocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to dysmotility and enhanced excitability of myenteric AH neurones in the inflamed guinea pig distal colon. / Linden, David R; Sharkey, Keith A.; Ho, Winnie; Mawe, Gary M.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 557, No. 1, 15.05.2004, p. 191-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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