Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase

Robert Gassner, Michael J. Buckley, Helga Georgescu, Rebecca Studer, Maja Stefanovich-Racic, Nicholas P. Piesco, Christopher H Evans, Sudha Agarwal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Continuous passive motion manifests therapeutic effects on inflamed articular joints by an as-yet-unknown mechanism. Here, we show that application of cyclic tensile stress (CTS) in vitro abrogates the catabolic effects of IL-1β on chondrocytes. The effects of CTS are mediated by down- regulation of IL-1β-dependent inducible NO production, and are directly attributed to the inhibition of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein synthesis. The inhibition of iNOS induction by CTS is paralleled by abrogation of IL-1β-induced down-regulation of proteoglycan synthesis. Furthermore, CTS inhibits iNOS expression and up-regulates proteoglycan synthesis at concentrations of IL-1β frequently observed in inflamed arthritic joints, suggesting that the actions of CTS may be clinically relevant in suppressing the sustained effects of pathological levels of IL- 1β in vivo. These results are the first to demonstrate that mechanisms of the intracellular actions of CTS in IL-1β-activated chondrocytes are mediated through inhibition of a key molecule in the signal transduction pathway that leads to iNOS expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2187-2192
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume163
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Chondrocytes
Interleukin-1
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Joints
Proteoglycans
Down-Regulation
Therapeutic Uses
Arthritis
Signal Transduction
Up-Regulation
Messenger RNA
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Gassner, R., Buckley, M. J., Georgescu, H., Studer, R., Stefanovich-Racic, M., Piesco, N. P., ... Agarwal, S. (1999). Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. Journal of Immunology, 163(4), 2187-2192.

Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. / Gassner, Robert; Buckley, Michael J.; Georgescu, Helga; Studer, Rebecca; Stefanovich-Racic, Maja; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Evans, Christopher H; Agarwal, Sudha.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 163, No. 4, 15.08.1999, p. 2187-2192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gassner, R, Buckley, MJ, Georgescu, H, Studer, R, Stefanovich-Racic, M, Piesco, NP, Evans, CH & Agarwal, S 1999, 'Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase', Journal of Immunology, vol. 163, no. 4, pp. 2187-2192.
Gassner R, Buckley MJ, Georgescu H, Studer R, Stefanovich-Racic M, Piesco NP et al. Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. Journal of Immunology. 1999 Aug 15;163(4):2187-2192.
Gassner, Robert ; Buckley, Michael J. ; Georgescu, Helga ; Studer, Rebecca ; Stefanovich-Racic, Maja ; Piesco, Nicholas P. ; Evans, Christopher H ; Agarwal, Sudha. / Cyclic tensile stress exerts antiinflammatory actions on chondrocytes by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. In: Journal of Immunology. 1999 ; Vol. 163, No. 4. pp. 2187-2192.
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