Current pharmacotherapies for Alzheimer's disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This brief overview will describe some of the current anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) agents. The relevance of the cholinergic deficit in AD is well- established. Cholinesterase inhibitor (CEI) drugs represent the only FDA- approved primary treatment options for AD as of April 1998. Modest efficacy for AD now has been shown in well-designed clinical trials for six separate CEI agents. Only two, tacrine and donepezil, are currently on the market in the United States, but several others, including rivastigmine (ENA-713), metrifonate, and physostigmine-CR could be avoidable by the end of 1998. Three other treatment strategies are being pursued. Estrogen replacement therapy as a treatment for AD in postmenopausal women is under active investigation. Analogously, clinical studies provide evidence that individuals using anti-inflammatory agents have a lower probability of developing AD. The success of alpha-tocopherol and selegiline in a recently conducted 2-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a role in AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeriatrics
Volume53
Issue number9 SUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Alzheimer Disease
Rivastigmine
Drug Therapy
Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Trichlorfon
Selegiline
Tacrine
Physostigmine
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
alpha-Tocopherol
Cholinergic Agents
Oxidative Stress
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Therapeutics
Placebos
Clinical Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Current pharmacotherapies for Alzheimer's disease. / Knopman, David S.

In: Geriatrics, Vol. 53, No. 9 SUPPL. 1, 1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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