Current indications, strategies, and outcomes with cardiac transplantation for cardiac amyloidosis and sarcoidosis

Andrew N. Rosenbaum, Brooks Sayre Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We describe the general strategies for the management of cardiac amyloidosis with particular focus on the use of cardiac transplantation for amyloid cardiomyopathy. Within this article, we highlight recent data regarding the use of combined heart transplant-chemotherapy, use of cardiac transplant in mutant amyloid disease, and underutilization of cardiac transplantation in sarcoidosis.

RECENT FINDINGS: Several center experiences have been recently published, describing management strategies in AL amyloid, with focus on timing of chemotherapy as it relates to transplant, and in mutant amyloid in particular.

SUMMARY: Outcomes after heart transplantation are typically worse than in patients undergoing heart transplantation for nonamyloid disease. Staged heart transplantation followed by autologous stem cell transplant therapy appears to provide the best long-term outcome for AL amyloid in highly selected patients. Mutant transthyretin amyloidosis is a disorder related to production of abnormal transthyretin protein in the liver. Combined heart/liver transplant has been utilized to treat both the production of the abnormal transthyretin protein and manage the cardiac dysfunction in highly selected patients, with favorable outcomes. Wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis occurs predominantly in older men. Cardiac transplantation can be utilized for highly selected patients. Sarcoidosis with cardiac involvement, unresponsive to immunosuppressive therapy, may be treated successfully with cardiac transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-592
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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