CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone gender difference: Implications for neurobiology and treatment of depression

Mark A Frye, Keith A. Gary, Lauren B. Marangell, Mark S. George, Ann M. Callahan, John T. Little, Teresa Huggins, Gabriela Corá-Locatelli, Elizabeth A. Osuch, Andrew Winokur, Robert M. Post

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In light of the postulated role of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as an endogenous anti-depressant, 56 refractory mood-disordered patients and 34 healthy adult control subjects underwent lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) TRH analysis. By two-way analysis of variance, there was no difference between CSF TRH in patients (as a group or by diagnostic subtype) and control subjects (n = 90, F = 0.91, df = 2,84, P = 0.41). There was, however, a CSF TRH gender difference (females, 2.95 pg/ml; males, 3.98 pg/ml; n = 90, F = 4.11, df = 1,84, P < 0.05). A post hoc t-test revealed the greatest gender difference in the bipolar group (t = 2.52, P < 0.02). There was no significant difference in CSF TRH in 'ill' vs. 'well' state (n = 20, P = 0.41). The role of elevated levels of CSF TRH in affectively ill men - or the role of decreased levels of CSF TRH in affectively ill women - remains to be investigated but could be of pathophysiological relevance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-353
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
Neurobiology
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Depression
Therapeutics
Spinal Puncture
Analysis of Variance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Frye, M. A., Gary, K. A., Marangell, L. B., George, M. S., Callahan, A. M., Little, J. T., ... Post, R. M. (1999). CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone gender difference: Implications for neurobiology and treatment of depression. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 11(3), 349-353.

CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone gender difference : Implications for neurobiology and treatment of depression. / Frye, Mark A; Gary, Keith A.; Marangell, Lauren B.; George, Mark S.; Callahan, Ann M.; Little, John T.; Huggins, Teresa; Corá-Locatelli, Gabriela; Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Winokur, Andrew; Post, Robert M.

In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 11, No. 3, 06.1999, p. 349-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Frye, MA, Gary, KA, Marangell, LB, George, MS, Callahan, AM, Little, JT, Huggins, T, Corá-Locatelli, G, Osuch, EA, Winokur, A & Post, RM 1999, 'CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone gender difference: Implications for neurobiology and treatment of depression', Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 349-353.
Frye, Mark A ; Gary, Keith A. ; Marangell, Lauren B. ; George, Mark S. ; Callahan, Ann M. ; Little, John T. ; Huggins, Teresa ; Corá-Locatelli, Gabriela ; Osuch, Elizabeth A. ; Winokur, Andrew ; Post, Robert M. / CSF thyrotropin-releasing hormone gender difference : Implications for neurobiology and treatment of depression. In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. 1999 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 349-353.
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