Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of biliary epithelia requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin via c-Src

Xian Ming Chen, Bing Q. Huang, Patrick L. Splinter, Hong Cao, Guan Zhu, Mark A Mc Niven, Nicholas F La Russo

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Abstract

Background & Aims: Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of epithelia requires polymerization of host cell actin at the attachment site. We analyzed the role of host cell c-Src, a cytoskeleton-associated protein tyrosine kinase, in C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelia. Methods: In vitro models of biliary cryptosporidiosis using a human biliary epithelial cell line were used to assay the role of c-Src signaling pathway in C. parvum invasion. Results: c-Src and cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate for c-Src, were recruited to the parasite-host cell interface during C. parvum invasion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in infected cells was also detected. Inhibition of host cell c-Src significantly blocked C. parvum-induced accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and actin polymerization at the attachment sites, thereby inhibiting C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells. A triple mutation of tyrosine of cortactin in the epithelia also diminished C. parvum invasion. In addition, proteins originating from the parasite were detected within infected cells at the parasite-host cell interface. Antiserum against C. parvum membrane proteins blocked accumulation of c-Src and cortactin and significantly decreased C. parvum invasion. No accumulation of the endocytosis-related proteins, dynamin 2 and clathrin, was found at the parasite-host cell interface; also, inhibition of dynamin 2 did not block C. parvum invasion. Conclusions: C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin by a c-Src-mediated signaling pathway to induce actin polymerization at the attachment site, a process associated with microbial secretion but independent of host cell endocytosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-228
Number of pages13
JournalGastroenterology
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

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Cortactin
Cryptosporidium parvum
Tyrosine
Epithelium
Phosphorylation
Parasites
Dynamin II
Polymerization
Actins
Epithelial Cells
Endocytosis
Cryptosporidiosis
Microfilament Proteins
Clathrin
Cytoskeleton
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Immune Sera

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of biliary epithelia requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin via c-Src. / Chen, Xian Ming; Huang, Bing Q.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Cao, Hong; Zhu, Guan; Mc Niven, Mark A; La Russo, Nicholas F.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.07.2003, p. 216-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Xian Ming ; Huang, Bing Q. ; Splinter, Patrick L. ; Cao, Hong ; Zhu, Guan ; Mc Niven, Mark A ; La Russo, Nicholas F. / Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of biliary epithelia requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin via c-Src. In: Gastroenterology. 2003 ; Vol. 125, No. 1. pp. 216-228.
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abstract = "Background & Aims: Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of epithelia requires polymerization of host cell actin at the attachment site. We analyzed the role of host cell c-Src, a cytoskeleton-associated protein tyrosine kinase, in C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelia. Methods: In vitro models of biliary cryptosporidiosis using a human biliary epithelial cell line were used to assay the role of c-Src signaling pathway in C. parvum invasion. Results: c-Src and cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate for c-Src, were recruited to the parasite-host cell interface during C. parvum invasion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in infected cells was also detected. Inhibition of host cell c-Src significantly blocked C. parvum-induced accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and actin polymerization at the attachment sites, thereby inhibiting C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells. A triple mutation of tyrosine of cortactin in the epithelia also diminished C. parvum invasion. In addition, proteins originating from the parasite were detected within infected cells at the parasite-host cell interface. Antiserum against C. parvum membrane proteins blocked accumulation of c-Src and cortactin and significantly decreased C. parvum invasion. No accumulation of the endocytosis-related proteins, dynamin 2 and clathrin, was found at the parasite-host cell interface; also, inhibition of dynamin 2 did not block C. parvum invasion. Conclusions: C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin by a c-Src-mediated signaling pathway to induce actin polymerization at the attachment site, a process associated with microbial secretion but independent of host cell endocytosis.",
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AU - Mc Niven, Mark A

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AB - Background & Aims: Cryptosporidium parvum invasion of epithelia requires polymerization of host cell actin at the attachment site. We analyzed the role of host cell c-Src, a cytoskeleton-associated protein tyrosine kinase, in C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelia. Methods: In vitro models of biliary cryptosporidiosis using a human biliary epithelial cell line were used to assay the role of c-Src signaling pathway in C. parvum invasion. Results: c-Src and cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate for c-Src, were recruited to the parasite-host cell interface during C. parvum invasion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in infected cells was also detected. Inhibition of host cell c-Src significantly blocked C. parvum-induced accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and actin polymerization at the attachment sites, thereby inhibiting C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells. A triple mutation of tyrosine of cortactin in the epithelia also diminished C. parvum invasion. In addition, proteins originating from the parasite were detected within infected cells at the parasite-host cell interface. Antiserum against C. parvum membrane proteins blocked accumulation of c-Src and cortactin and significantly decreased C. parvum invasion. No accumulation of the endocytosis-related proteins, dynamin 2 and clathrin, was found at the parasite-host cell interface; also, inhibition of dynamin 2 did not block C. parvum invasion. Conclusions: C. parvum invasion of biliary epithelial cells requires host cell tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin by a c-Src-mediated signaling pathway to induce actin polymerization at the attachment site, a process associated with microbial secretion but independent of host cell endocytosis.

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