CRMP-5 neuronal autoantibody: Marker of lung cancer and thymoma-related autoimmunity

Zhiya Yu, Thomas J. Kryzer, Guy E. Griesmann, Kwang Kuk Kim, Eduardo E. Benarroch, Vanda A Lennon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We have defined a new paraneoplastic immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibody specific for CRMP-5, a previously unknown 62-kd neuronal cytoplasmic protein of the collapsin response-mediator family. CRMP-5 is in adult central and peripheral neurons, including synapses, and in small-cell lung carcinomas. Since 1993, our Clinical Neuroimmunology Laboratory has detected CRMP-5-IgG in 121 patients among approximately 68,000 whose sera were submitted for standardized immunofluorescence screening because a subacute neurological presentation was suspected to be paraneoplastic. This makes CRMP-5 autoantibody as frequent as PCA-1 (anti-Yo) autoantibody, second only to ANNA-1 (anti-Hu). Clinical information, obtained for 116 patients, revealed multifocal neurological signs. Most remarkable were the high frequencies of chorea (11%) and cranial neuropathy (17%, including 10% loss of olfaction/taste, 7% optic neuropathy). Other common signs were peripheral neuropathy (47%), autonomic neuropathy (31%), cerebellar ataxia (26%), subacute dementia (25%), and neuromuscular junction disorders (12%). Spinal fluid was inflammatory in 86%, and CRMP-5-IgG in 37% equaled or significantly exceeded serum titers. Lung carcinoma (mostly limited small-cell) was found in 77% of patients; thymoma was in 6%. Half of those remaining had miscellaneous neoplasms; all but two were smokers. Serum IgG in all cases bound to recombinant CRMP-5 (predominantly N-terminal epitopes), but not to human CRMP-2 or CRMP-3.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-154
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Thymoma
Autoimmunity
Autoantibodies
Lung Neoplasms
Immunoglobulin G
Neuromuscular Junction Diseases
Serum
Semaphorin-3A
Cranial Nerve Diseases
Chorea
Cerebellar Ataxia
Optic Nerve Diseases
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis
Smell
Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Synapses
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Dementia
Epitopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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CRMP-5 neuronal autoantibody : Marker of lung cancer and thymoma-related autoimmunity. / Yu, Zhiya; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Griesmann, Guy E.; Kim, Kwang Kuk; Benarroch, Eduardo E.; Lennon, Vanda A.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 49, No. 2, 2001, p. 146-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Zhiya ; Kryzer, Thomas J. ; Griesmann, Guy E. ; Kim, Kwang Kuk ; Benarroch, Eduardo E. ; Lennon, Vanda A. / CRMP-5 neuronal autoantibody : Marker of lung cancer and thymoma-related autoimmunity. In: Annals of Neurology. 2001 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 146-154.
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