Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces

S. S. Shah, J. Y. Lee, Alexander Revzin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper describes a novel approach of forming micropatterned co-cultures using a combination of oxygen plasma ashing and electrochemical removal of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane from indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. After assembling a layer of PEG silane on ITO, photolithography and oxygen plasma cleaning were used to form cell-adhesive domains within the non-fouling PEG silane layer. After patterning hepatocytes in these domains, the surrounding PEG silane layer was desorbed by applying negative voltage (-1.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl) to the underlying ITO substrate. This switched the fouling properties of the ITO substrate and allowed the adsorption of another cell type creating a micropatterned co-culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages257-259
Number of pages3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 12 2008Oct 16 2008

Other

Other12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period10/12/0810/16/08

Fingerprint

Fouling
Polyethylene glycols
Tin oxides
Silanes
Indium
Substrates
Oxygen
Plasmas
Photolithography
Cleaning
Adhesives
Adsorption
indium tin oxide
poly(ethylene glycol)silane
Electric potential

Keywords

  • Micropatterned co-culture
  • Photolithography
  • Switchable biointerface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Shah, S. S., Lee, J. Y., & Revzin, A. (2008). Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces. 257-259. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008, San Diego, CA, United States.

Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces. / Shah, S. S.; Lee, J. Y.; Revzin, Alexander.

2008. 257-259 Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008, San Diego, CA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Shah, SS, Lee, JY & Revzin, A 2008, 'Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces', Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008, San Diego, CA, United States, 10/12/08 - 10/16/08 pp. 257-259.
Shah SS, Lee JY, Revzin A. Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces. 2008. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008, San Diego, CA, United States.
Shah, S. S. ; Lee, J. Y. ; Revzin, Alexander. / Creating cellular micropatterns by switching fouling properties of electroactive ito surfaces. Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2008, San Diego, CA, United States.3 p.
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