Correlation Between Molecular Subclassifications of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Targeted Therapy Response

Thai H Ho, Toni K. Choueiri, Kai Wang, Jose A. Karam, Zachary Chalmers, Garrett Frampton, Julia A. Elvin, Adrienne Johnson, Xueli Liu, Yulan Lin, Richard W Joseph, Melissa L. Stanton, Vincent A. Miller, Philip J. Stephens, Jeffrey S. Ross, Siraj M. Ali, Sumanta K. Pal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed therapies are the standard of care in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC) but are not used based on molecular subclassifications of ccRCC. Objective: To determine if an association exists between genomic alterations (GAs) detected by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) in the course of clinical care and the response to anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and anti-MTOR pathway targeted therapies in a cohort of patients with treated mccRCC. Design, setting, and participants: CGP, using a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified platform, was performed on 31 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens (84% from cytoreductive nephrectomies) obtained from patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who had received VEGFR and/or mTOR inhibitors. Duration of treatment (DOT) and extent and duration of clinical response were obtained from review of medical records. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: All classes of GAs-base substitutions, short insertions, deletions, gene fusions, rearrangements, and copy number-were assessed via hybrid capture-based CGP. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the frequency of GAs in groups segregated by the DOT with VEGF-directed agents. Results and limitations: The most common GAs detected in this series were in VHL (70%), PBRM1 (48%), SETD2 (32%), TSC1 (29%), MLL (19%), TERT (16%), ARID1B (16%), and KDM5C (16%). Across 61 administrations of VEGF-directed therapy in 27 patients, exceptional responses (DOT >21 mo) were more frequent among patients with GAs in KDM5C, PBRM1, and VHL. Conversely, these patients also featured a lower frequency of GA associated with response to mTOR-directed therapy, such as TSC1. Conclusions: Molecular subclassifications may affect response to VEGF-directed therapy. The predictive and prognostic nature of these molecular subclassifications in the metastatic setting should be explored in an extended series. Patient summary: Comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients with advanced kidney cancer who stand to benefit more from specific molecular-targeted agents. A paradox in modern oncology is that in treating advanced kidney cancer, molecular targeted therapies are administered without confirmation of the mutated target in the individual patient. We report that comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients who stand to benefit more from specific targeted agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-209
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Urology Focus
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Renal Cell Carcinoma
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Sirolimus
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor
Therapeutics
Kidney Neoplasms
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Gene Rearrangement
Gene Fusion
Standard of Care
Nephrectomy
Paraffin
Formaldehyde
Medical Records

Keywords

  • BAP1
  • Comprehensive genomic profiling
  • MTOR
  • PBRM1
  • Renal cell carcinoma
  • SETD2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Correlation Between Molecular Subclassifications of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Targeted Therapy Response. / Ho, Thai H; Choueiri, Toni K.; Wang, Kai; Karam, Jose A.; Chalmers, Zachary; Frampton, Garrett; Elvin, Julia A.; Johnson, Adrienne; Liu, Xueli; Lin, Yulan; Joseph, Richard W; Stanton, Melissa L.; Miller, Vincent A.; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Ali, Siraj M.; Pal, Sumanta K.

In: European Urology Focus, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 204-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ho, TH, Choueiri, TK, Wang, K, Karam, JA, Chalmers, Z, Frampton, G, Elvin, JA, Johnson, A, Liu, X, Lin, Y, Joseph, RW, Stanton, ML, Miller, VA, Stephens, PJ, Ross, JS, Ali, SM & Pal, SK 2016, 'Correlation Between Molecular Subclassifications of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Targeted Therapy Response', European Urology Focus, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 204-209. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euf.2015.11.007
Ho, Thai H ; Choueiri, Toni K. ; Wang, Kai ; Karam, Jose A. ; Chalmers, Zachary ; Frampton, Garrett ; Elvin, Julia A. ; Johnson, Adrienne ; Liu, Xueli ; Lin, Yulan ; Joseph, Richard W ; Stanton, Melissa L. ; Miller, Vincent A. ; Stephens, Philip J. ; Ross, Jeffrey S. ; Ali, Siraj M. ; Pal, Sumanta K. / Correlation Between Molecular Subclassifications of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Targeted Therapy Response. In: European Urology Focus. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 204-209.
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T1 - Correlation Between Molecular Subclassifications of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma and Targeted Therapy Response

AU - Ho, Thai H

AU - Choueiri, Toni K.

AU - Wang, Kai

AU - Karam, Jose A.

AU - Chalmers, Zachary

AU - Frampton, Garrett

AU - Elvin, Julia A.

AU - Johnson, Adrienne

AU - Liu, Xueli

AU - Lin, Yulan

AU - Joseph, Richard W

AU - Stanton, Melissa L.

AU - Miller, Vincent A.

AU - Stephens, Philip J.

AU - Ross, Jeffrey S.

AU - Ali, Siraj M.

AU - Pal, Sumanta K.

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed therapies are the standard of care in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC) but are not used based on molecular subclassifications of ccRCC. Objective: To determine if an association exists between genomic alterations (GAs) detected by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) in the course of clinical care and the response to anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and anti-MTOR pathway targeted therapies in a cohort of patients with treated mccRCC. Design, setting, and participants: CGP, using a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified platform, was performed on 31 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens (84% from cytoreductive nephrectomies) obtained from patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who had received VEGFR and/or mTOR inhibitors. Duration of treatment (DOT) and extent and duration of clinical response were obtained from review of medical records. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: All classes of GAs-base substitutions, short insertions, deletions, gene fusions, rearrangements, and copy number-were assessed via hybrid capture-based CGP. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the frequency of GAs in groups segregated by the DOT with VEGF-directed agents. Results and limitations: The most common GAs detected in this series were in VHL (70%), PBRM1 (48%), SETD2 (32%), TSC1 (29%), MLL (19%), TERT (16%), ARID1B (16%), and KDM5C (16%). Across 61 administrations of VEGF-directed therapy in 27 patients, exceptional responses (DOT >21 mo) were more frequent among patients with GAs in KDM5C, PBRM1, and VHL. Conversely, these patients also featured a lower frequency of GA associated with response to mTOR-directed therapy, such as TSC1. Conclusions: Molecular subclassifications may affect response to VEGF-directed therapy. The predictive and prognostic nature of these molecular subclassifications in the metastatic setting should be explored in an extended series. Patient summary: Comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients with advanced kidney cancer who stand to benefit more from specific molecular-targeted agents. A paradox in modern oncology is that in treating advanced kidney cancer, molecular targeted therapies are administered without confirmation of the mutated target in the individual patient. We report that comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients who stand to benefit more from specific targeted agents.

AB - Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed therapies are the standard of care in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC) but are not used based on molecular subclassifications of ccRCC. Objective: To determine if an association exists between genomic alterations (GAs) detected by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) in the course of clinical care and the response to anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and anti-MTOR pathway targeted therapies in a cohort of patients with treated mccRCC. Design, setting, and participants: CGP, using a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified platform, was performed on 31 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens (84% from cytoreductive nephrectomies) obtained from patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who had received VEGFR and/or mTOR inhibitors. Duration of treatment (DOT) and extent and duration of clinical response were obtained from review of medical records. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: All classes of GAs-base substitutions, short insertions, deletions, gene fusions, rearrangements, and copy number-were assessed via hybrid capture-based CGP. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the frequency of GAs in groups segregated by the DOT with VEGF-directed agents. Results and limitations: The most common GAs detected in this series were in VHL (70%), PBRM1 (48%), SETD2 (32%), TSC1 (29%), MLL (19%), TERT (16%), ARID1B (16%), and KDM5C (16%). Across 61 administrations of VEGF-directed therapy in 27 patients, exceptional responses (DOT >21 mo) were more frequent among patients with GAs in KDM5C, PBRM1, and VHL. Conversely, these patients also featured a lower frequency of GA associated with response to mTOR-directed therapy, such as TSC1. Conclusions: Molecular subclassifications may affect response to VEGF-directed therapy. The predictive and prognostic nature of these molecular subclassifications in the metastatic setting should be explored in an extended series. Patient summary: Comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients with advanced kidney cancer who stand to benefit more from specific molecular-targeted agents. A paradox in modern oncology is that in treating advanced kidney cancer, molecular targeted therapies are administered without confirmation of the mutated target in the individual patient. We report that comprehensive genomic profiling in the course of clinical care in the community oncology setting can delineate subgroups of patients who stand to benefit more from specific targeted agents.

KW - BAP1

KW - Comprehensive genomic profiling

KW - MTOR

KW - PBRM1

KW - Renal cell carcinoma

KW - SETD2

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