Control of a brain-computer interface using stereotactic depth electrodes in and adjacent to the hippocampus

D. J. Krusienski, J. J. Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that enables severely disabled people to communicate and interact with their environments using their brain waves. Most research investigating BCI in humans has used scalp-recorded electroencephalography or intracranial electrocorticography. The use of brain signals obtained directly from stereotactic depth electrodes to control a BCI has not previously been explored. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from bilateral stereotactic depth electrodes implanted in and adjacent to the hippocampus were used to control a P300 Speller paradigm. The ERPs were preprocessed and used to train a linear classifier to subsequently predict the intended target letters. The classifier was able to predict the intended target character at or near 100% accuracy using fewer than 15 stimulation sequences in the two subjects tested. Our results demonstrate that ERPs from hippocampal and hippocampal adjacent depth electrodes can be used to reliably control the P300 Speller BCI paradigm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number025006
JournalJournal of Neural Engineering
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Brain computer interface
Hippocampus
Electrodes
Evoked Potentials
Brain
Classifiers
Brain Waves
Implanted Electrodes
Electroencephalography
Scalp
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Electrocorticography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Control of a brain-computer interface using stereotactic depth electrodes in and adjacent to the hippocampus. / Krusienski, D. J.; Shih, J. J.

In: Journal of Neural Engineering, Vol. 8, No. 2, 025006, 04.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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