Contextual Computing: A Bluetooth based approach for tracking healthcare providers in the emergency room

Joshua Frisby, Vernon Smith, Stephen Traub, Vimla L. Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) frequently experience crowding. One of the factors that contributes to this crowding is the “door to doctor time”, which is the time from a patient's registration to when the patient is first seen by a physician. This is also one of the Meaningful Use (MU) performance measures that emergency departments report to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Current documentation methods for this measure are inaccurate due to the imprecision in manual data collection. We describe a method for automatically (in real time) and more accurately documenting the door to physician time. Using sensor-based technology, the distance between the physician and the computer is calculated by using the single board computers installed in patient rooms that log each time a Bluetooth signal is seen from a device that the physicians carry. This distance is compared automatically with the accepted room radius to determine if the physicians are present in the room at the time logged to provide greater precision. The logged times, accurate to the second, were compared with physicians’ handwritten times, showing automatic recordings to be more precise. This real time automatic method will free the physician from extra cognitive load of manually recording data. This method for evaluation of performance is generic and can be used in any other setting outside the ED, and for purposes other than measuring physician time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomedical Informatics
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Emergency rooms
Bluetooth
Health Personnel
Hospital Emergency Service
Data recording
Physicians
Printed circuit boards
Sensors
Crowding
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
Patients' Rooms
Personal Autonomy
Hospital Departments
Documentation

Keywords

  • Clinical workflow
  • Contextual Computing
  • Meaningful Use
  • Patient safety
  • Sensor-based tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Contextual Computing : A Bluetooth based approach for tracking healthcare providers in the emergency room. / Frisby, Joshua; Smith, Vernon; Traub, Stephen; Patel, Vimla L.

In: Journal of Biomedical Informatics, Vol. 65, 01.01.2017, p. 97-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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