Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies

David Rempel, Bradley Evanoff, Peter C Amadio, Marc De Krom, Gary Franklin, Alfred Franzblau, Ron Gray, Fredric Gerr, Mats Hagberg, Thomas Hales, Jeffrey N. Katz, Glenn Pransky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

414 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome for use in epidemiologic studies were developed by means of a consensus process. Twelve medical researchers with experience in conducting epidemiologic studies of carpal tunnel syndrome participated in the process. The group reached agreement on several conceptual issues. First, there is no perfect gold standard for carpal tunnel syndrome. The combination of electrodiagnostic study findings and symptom characteristics will provide the most accurate information for classification of carpal tunnel syndrome. Second, use of only electrodiagnostic study findings is not recommended. Finally, in the absence of electrodiagnostic studies, specific combinations of symptom characteristics and physical examination findings may be useful in some settings but are likely to result in greater misclassification of disease status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1447-1451
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume88
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1998

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Epidemiologic Studies
Physical Examination
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rempel, D., Evanoff, B., Amadio, P. C., De Krom, M., Franklin, G., Franzblau, A., ... Pransky, G. (1998). Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies. American Journal of Public Health, 88(10), 1447-1451.

Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies. / Rempel, David; Evanoff, Bradley; Amadio, Peter C; De Krom, Marc; Franklin, Gary; Franzblau, Alfred; Gray, Ron; Gerr, Fredric; Hagberg, Mats; Hales, Thomas; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Pransky, Glenn.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 88, No. 10, 10.1998, p. 1447-1451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rempel, D, Evanoff, B, Amadio, PC, De Krom, M, Franklin, G, Franzblau, A, Gray, R, Gerr, F, Hagberg, M, Hales, T, Katz, JN & Pransky, G 1998, 'Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 88, no. 10, pp. 1447-1451.
Rempel D, Evanoff B, Amadio PC, De Krom M, Franklin G, Franzblau A et al. Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies. American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1447-1451.
Rempel, David ; Evanoff, Bradley ; Amadio, Peter C ; De Krom, Marc ; Franklin, Gary ; Franzblau, Alfred ; Gray, Ron ; Gerr, Fredric ; Hagberg, Mats ; Hales, Thomas ; Katz, Jeffrey N. ; Pransky, Glenn. / Consensus criteria for the classification of carpal tunnel syndrome in epidemiologic studies. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1998 ; Vol. 88, No. 10. pp. 1447-1451.
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