Computer versus compensatory calendar training in individuals with mild cognitive impairment: Functional impact in a pilot study

Melanie J. Chandler, Dona E.C. Locke, Noah L. Duncan, Sherrie M. Hanna, Andrea V. Cuc, Julie A. Fields, Charlene R. Hoffman Snyder, Angela M. Lunde, Glenn E. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. Measures of adherence, memory-based activities of daily living (mADLs), and self-efficacy were completed. The calendar training group demonstrated significant improvement in mADLs compared to controls, while the computer training group did not. Calendar training may be more effective in improving mADLs than computerized intervention. However, this study highlights how behavioral trials with fewer than 30-50 participants per arm are likely underpowered, resulting in seemingly null findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2017

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Behavioral rehabilitation
  • Cognitive rehabilitation
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Computer versus compensatory calendar training in individuals with mild cognitive impairment: Functional impact in a pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this