Complications of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Management of insulin reactions and acute illness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Occasional mild hypoglycemia is an unavoidable and usually acceptable side effect of intensive insulin therapy. Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus may have impaired glucose counterregulation, which may increase the risk of hypoglycemia and justify less ambitious glycemic goals. A conservative but flexible approach to the treatment of insulin reactions is appropriate in order to avoid hyperglycemia. Insulin requirements are often increased during acute illness, and frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose concentrations is necessary to determine the need for supplementation with regular insulin. Frequent supplementation, together with modification of diet and maintenance of fluid intake, should not only minimize the need for hospitalization but also prevent severe deterioration in glycemic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)820-824
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume61
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1986

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Hypoglycemia
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Diet Therapy
Hyperglycemia
Hospitalization
Maintenance
Glucose
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Complications of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus : Management of insulin reactions and acute illness. / Miles, J. M.; Jensen, Michael Dennis.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 61, No. 10, 1986, p. 820-824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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