Complications associated with surveying medical student depression: The importance of anonymity

Ruth E. Levine, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Frederick S. Sierles, Gwendie Camp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate students' attitudes and concerns regarding potential repercussions of completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Methods: A survey based on focus group data was developed and distributed. Results: One hundred and ninety-one of 400 surveys (48%) were returned. Of 160 students who remembered completing the BDI, 31 (19%) admitted to concerns about the research, and nearly 10% admitted to recording dishonest answers. Conclusions: These findings emphasize the importance of conducting anonymous assessments of medical students, particularly when assessing sensitive psychological states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-18
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

anonymity
Medical Students
medical student
Depression
Students
Equipment and Supplies
Focus Groups
recording
student
Psychology
Research
Group
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

Complications associated with surveying medical student depression : The importance of anonymity. / Levine, Ruth E.; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Sierles, Frederick S.; Camp, Gwendie.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 27, No. 1, 03.2003, p. 12-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levine, Ruth E. ; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen ; Sierles, Frederick S. ; Camp, Gwendie. / Complications associated with surveying medical student depression : The importance of anonymity. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 12-18.
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