Completion of the human papillomavirus vaccination series lags in Somali adolescents

Crystal N. Pruitt, Crystal S. Reese, Brandon R. Grossardt, Abdirashid M. Shire, Douglas J. Creedon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. It is unknown whether the Somali population in the United States is likely to participate in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We aimed to determine whether Somali girls living in a US community are following the recommendations for HPV vaccination. Materials and Methods. We conducted a study of HPV vaccination among Somali girls seen at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Each Somali subject wasmatched by year of birth to white/non-Hispanic subjects in a 1:3 ratio. We abstracted information between August 1, 2006, and December 31, 2009, related to HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Initiation and completion frequencies were compared between study groups using the W2 test. Results. A total of 251 Somali and 727white/non-Hispanic girls were identified, using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, who met all inclusion criteria for final analysis. A total of 114 Somali girls (45%) and 334white/non-Hispanic girls (46%) initiated the series (odds ratio = 0.98; 95% confidence interval = 0.73-1.31), but only 59 Somali girls (52%) completed the vaccination series, compared with 240 (72%) of the white/non-Hispanic girls (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.27-0.65). Conclusions. We found Somali girls to be generally accepting of initiating the HPV vaccine series but less likely to complete the series as comparedwithwhite non-Hispanic girls of the same age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-288
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Lower Genital Tract Disease
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Vaccination
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Epidemiology
Parturition
Population

Keywords

  • Emigrants and immigrants
  • Papillomavirus vaccines
  • Sexually transmitted Diseases
  • Somalia
  • Uterine cervical neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Completion of the human papillomavirus vaccination series lags in Somali adolescents. / Pruitt, Crystal N.; Reese, Crystal S.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Shire, Abdirashid M.; Creedon, Douglas J.

In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, Vol. 17, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 280-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pruitt, Crystal N. ; Reese, Crystal S. ; Grossardt, Brandon R. ; Shire, Abdirashid M. ; Creedon, Douglas J. / Completion of the human papillomavirus vaccination series lags in Somali adolescents. In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 280-288.
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