Comparison of the predischarge exercise thallium-201 perfusion defect after myocardial infarction with myocardium at risk measured during acute infarction with technetium-99m sestamibi imaging

André C. Lapeyre, Mark A. Evans, Timothy F. Christian, John R. Daley, Raymond J Gibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Exercise thallium-201 imaging provides a noninvasive estimate of the amount of myocardium presumed to be at risk of infarcting should a complete occlusion of the coronary stenosis occur. The relationship between the size of the exercise thallium perfusion defect and the extent of myocardium supplied by a diseased coronary artery has not been established. This study evaluates that presumed correlation. Methods: Patients were injected intravenously with technetium-99m sestamibi during acute myocardial infarction before thrombolysis or conventional therapy to quantify the myocardium at risk. Twenty-six patients who underwent risk-area assessment subsequently underwent clinically driven, predischarge, submaximal exercise imaging with thallium-201. The exercise testing was performed on day 7 ± 2 days. A conventional polar map display was used to quantify the perfusion defect. Results: The myocardium at risk determined by technetium-99m sestamibi at the time of infarction was 30% ± 20% of the left ventricle. The mean exercise thallium-201 defect was 34% ± 22% of the left ventricle. The exercise defect tended to be slightly larger than the myocardium at risk (4% ± 10% of the left ventricle, P = .05). There was a close correlation between the 2 measurements (r = 0.89, SE = 9.4, P < .0001). Conclusions: This study shows a close correlation between the myocardium "at risk" assessed acutely by technetium-99m sestamibi and the "presumed at-risk area" determined by thallium-201 imaging on predischarge exercise testing. This finding supports the concept that the size of the exercise thallium defect caused by coronary stenosis indicates the likely size of a myocardial infarction resulting from occlusion of that stenosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume145
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

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Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
Thallium
Infarction
Myocardium
Perfusion
Myocardial Infarction
Exercise
Heart Ventricles
Coronary Stenosis
Coronary Artery Disease
Pathologic Constriction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Comparison of the predischarge exercise thallium-201 perfusion defect after myocardial infarction with myocardium at risk measured during acute infarction with technetium-99m sestamibi imaging. / Lapeyre, André C.; Evans, Mark A.; Christian, Timothy F.; Daley, John R.; Gibbons, Raymond J.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 145, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 357-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Exercise thallium-201 imaging provides a noninvasive estimate of the amount of myocardium presumed to be at risk of infarcting should a complete occlusion of the coronary stenosis occur. The relationship between the size of the exercise thallium perfusion defect and the extent of myocardium supplied by a diseased coronary artery has not been established. This study evaluates that presumed correlation. Methods: Patients were injected intravenously with technetium-99m sestamibi during acute myocardial infarction before thrombolysis or conventional therapy to quantify the myocardium at risk. Twenty-six patients who underwent risk-area assessment subsequently underwent clinically driven, predischarge, submaximal exercise imaging with thallium-201. The exercise testing was performed on day 7 ± 2 days. A conventional polar map display was used to quantify the perfusion defect. Results: The myocardium at risk determined by technetium-99m sestamibi at the time of infarction was 30{\%} ± 20{\%} of the left ventricle. The mean exercise thallium-201 defect was 34{\%} ± 22{\%} of the left ventricle. The exercise defect tended to be slightly larger than the myocardium at risk (4{\%} ± 10{\%} of the left ventricle, P = .05). There was a close correlation between the 2 measurements (r = 0.89, SE = 9.4, P < .0001). Conclusions: This study shows a close correlation between the myocardium {"}at risk{"} assessed acutely by technetium-99m sestamibi and the {"}presumed at-risk area{"} determined by thallium-201 imaging on predischarge exercise testing. This finding supports the concept that the size of the exercise thallium defect caused by coronary stenosis indicates the likely size of a myocardial infarction resulting from occlusion of that stenosis.",
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AU - Christian, Timothy F.

AU - Daley, John R.

AU - Gibbons, Raymond J

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N2 - Background: Exercise thallium-201 imaging provides a noninvasive estimate of the amount of myocardium presumed to be at risk of infarcting should a complete occlusion of the coronary stenosis occur. The relationship between the size of the exercise thallium perfusion defect and the extent of myocardium supplied by a diseased coronary artery has not been established. This study evaluates that presumed correlation. Methods: Patients were injected intravenously with technetium-99m sestamibi during acute myocardial infarction before thrombolysis or conventional therapy to quantify the myocardium at risk. Twenty-six patients who underwent risk-area assessment subsequently underwent clinically driven, predischarge, submaximal exercise imaging with thallium-201. The exercise testing was performed on day 7 ± 2 days. A conventional polar map display was used to quantify the perfusion defect. Results: The myocardium at risk determined by technetium-99m sestamibi at the time of infarction was 30% ± 20% of the left ventricle. The mean exercise thallium-201 defect was 34% ± 22% of the left ventricle. The exercise defect tended to be slightly larger than the myocardium at risk (4% ± 10% of the left ventricle, P = .05). There was a close correlation between the 2 measurements (r = 0.89, SE = 9.4, P < .0001). Conclusions: This study shows a close correlation between the myocardium "at risk" assessed acutely by technetium-99m sestamibi and the "presumed at-risk area" determined by thallium-201 imaging on predischarge exercise testing. This finding supports the concept that the size of the exercise thallium defect caused by coronary stenosis indicates the likely size of a myocardial infarction resulting from occlusion of that stenosis.

AB - Background: Exercise thallium-201 imaging provides a noninvasive estimate of the amount of myocardium presumed to be at risk of infarcting should a complete occlusion of the coronary stenosis occur. The relationship between the size of the exercise thallium perfusion defect and the extent of myocardium supplied by a diseased coronary artery has not been established. This study evaluates that presumed correlation. Methods: Patients were injected intravenously with technetium-99m sestamibi during acute myocardial infarction before thrombolysis or conventional therapy to quantify the myocardium at risk. Twenty-six patients who underwent risk-area assessment subsequently underwent clinically driven, predischarge, submaximal exercise imaging with thallium-201. The exercise testing was performed on day 7 ± 2 days. A conventional polar map display was used to quantify the perfusion defect. Results: The myocardium at risk determined by technetium-99m sestamibi at the time of infarction was 30% ± 20% of the left ventricle. The mean exercise thallium-201 defect was 34% ± 22% of the left ventricle. The exercise defect tended to be slightly larger than the myocardium at risk (4% ± 10% of the left ventricle, P = .05). There was a close correlation between the 2 measurements (r = 0.89, SE = 9.4, P < .0001). Conclusions: This study shows a close correlation between the myocardium "at risk" assessed acutely by technetium-99m sestamibi and the "presumed at-risk area" determined by thallium-201 imaging on predischarge exercise testing. This finding supports the concept that the size of the exercise thallium defect caused by coronary stenosis indicates the likely size of a myocardial infarction resulting from occlusion of that stenosis.

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