Comparing performance measures in dynamic job shops: economics vs. time

Thomas R. Rohleder, Gary D. Scudder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has considered the use of economic objectives in production scheduling environments as opposed to the classic time-based measures prevalent in the literature and in practice. This paper presents a comparison of both types of objectives to determine how differently the objectives select scheduling methods and how much economic loss occurs when using time-based measures. A dynamic job shop is modeled using computer simulation to study the problem. Various utilization and due-date allowance settings are considered in the experimental design, along with a variety of time-based and economic objectives and scheduling methods. The results show that percent tardy was the most effective time-based objective in meeting economic goals. However, even with this measure substantial economic loss occurs under certain conditions. In general, the time-based measures do not lead to similar scheduling decisions, while the various economic methods tended to lead to at least "good" economic decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-183
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Production Economics
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Economics
Scheduling
Performance measures
Job shop
Design of experiments
Computer simulation
Economic loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Comparing performance measures in dynamic job shops : economics vs. time. / Rohleder, Thomas R.; Scudder, Gary D.

In: International Journal of Production Economics, Vol. 32, No. 2, 1993, p. 169-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohleder, Thomas R. ; Scudder, Gary D. / Comparing performance measures in dynamic job shops : economics vs. time. In: International Journal of Production Economics. 1993 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 169-183.
@article{3e986b4cd46b4a6f8a3cbd71f2b794fc,
title = "Comparing performance measures in dynamic job shops: economics vs. time",
abstract = "Recent research has considered the use of economic objectives in production scheduling environments as opposed to the classic time-based measures prevalent in the literature and in practice. This paper presents a comparison of both types of objectives to determine how differently the objectives select scheduling methods and how much economic loss occurs when using time-based measures. A dynamic job shop is modeled using computer simulation to study the problem. Various utilization and due-date allowance settings are considered in the experimental design, along with a variety of time-based and economic objectives and scheduling methods. The results show that percent tardy was the most effective time-based objective in meeting economic goals. However, even with this measure substantial economic loss occurs under certain conditions. In general, the time-based measures do not lead to similar scheduling decisions, while the various economic methods tended to lead to at least {"}good{"} economic decisions.",
author = "Rohleder, {Thomas R.} and Scudder, {Gary D.}",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1016/0925-5273(93)90066-T",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "169--183",
journal = "International Journal of Production Economics",
issn = "0925-5273",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing performance measures in dynamic job shops

T2 - economics vs. time

AU - Rohleder, Thomas R.

AU - Scudder, Gary D.

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Recent research has considered the use of economic objectives in production scheduling environments as opposed to the classic time-based measures prevalent in the literature and in practice. This paper presents a comparison of both types of objectives to determine how differently the objectives select scheduling methods and how much economic loss occurs when using time-based measures. A dynamic job shop is modeled using computer simulation to study the problem. Various utilization and due-date allowance settings are considered in the experimental design, along with a variety of time-based and economic objectives and scheduling methods. The results show that percent tardy was the most effective time-based objective in meeting economic goals. However, even with this measure substantial economic loss occurs under certain conditions. In general, the time-based measures do not lead to similar scheduling decisions, while the various economic methods tended to lead to at least "good" economic decisions.

AB - Recent research has considered the use of economic objectives in production scheduling environments as opposed to the classic time-based measures prevalent in the literature and in practice. This paper presents a comparison of both types of objectives to determine how differently the objectives select scheduling methods and how much economic loss occurs when using time-based measures. A dynamic job shop is modeled using computer simulation to study the problem. Various utilization and due-date allowance settings are considered in the experimental design, along with a variety of time-based and economic objectives and scheduling methods. The results show that percent tardy was the most effective time-based objective in meeting economic goals. However, even with this measure substantial economic loss occurs under certain conditions. In general, the time-based measures do not lead to similar scheduling decisions, while the various economic methods tended to lead to at least "good" economic decisions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027664641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027664641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0925-5273(93)90066-T

DO - 10.1016/0925-5273(93)90066-T

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0027664641

VL - 32

SP - 169

EP - 183

JO - International Journal of Production Economics

JF - International Journal of Production Economics

SN - 0925-5273

IS - 2

ER -