Comparing outcomes and costs among warfarin-sensitive patients versus warfarininsensitive patients using the Right Drug, Right Dose, Right Time: Using genomic data to individualize treatment (RIGHT) 10K warfarin cohort

Kristi M. Swanson, Ye Zhu, Ricardo L. Rojas, Jennifer L. St. Sauver, Suzette J. Bielinski, Debra J. Jacobsen, Sue L. Visscher, Liewei Wang, Richard Weinshilboum, Bijan J. Borah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy has been the main treatment approach for stroke prevention for decades. Warfarin is the most widely prescribed OAC in the United States, but is difficult to manage due to variability in dose requirements across individuals. Pharmacogenomics may mitigate risk concerns related to warfarin use by fostering the opportunity to facilitate individualized medicine approaches to warfarin treatment (e.g., genome-guided dosing). While various economic evaluations exist examining the cost-effectiveness of pharmacogenomics testing for warfarin, few observational studies exist to support these studies, with even fewer using genotype as the main exposure of interest. We examined a cohort of individuals initiating warfarin therapy between 2004 and 2017 and examined bleeding and cost outcomes for the year following initiation using Mayo Clinic's billing and administrative data, as well the Mayo Clinic Rochester Cost Data Warehouse. Analyses included descriptive summaries, comparison of characteristics across exposure groups, reporting of crude outcomes, and multivariate analyses. We included N = 1,143 patients for analyses. Just over a third of our study population (34.9%) carried a warfarin-sensitive phenotype. Sensitive individuals differed in their baseline characteristics by being of older age and having a higher number of comorbid conditions; myocardial infarction, diabetes, and cancer in particular. The occurrence of bleeding events was not significantly different across exposure groups. No significant differences across exposure groups existed in either the likelihood of incurring all-cause healthcare costs or in the magnitude of those costs. Warfarin-sensitive individuals were no more likely to utilize cardiovascular-related healthcare services; however, they had lower total and inpatient cardiovascular-related costs compared to warfarininsensitive patients. No significant differences existed in any other categories of costs. We found limited evidence that warfarin-sensitive individuals have different healthcare spending than warfarin-insensitive individuals. Additional real-world studies are needed to support the traditional economic evaluations currently existing in the literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0233316
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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