Comparative genome hybridization suggests a role for NRXN1 and APBA2 in schizophrenia

George Kirov, Dilihan Gumus, Wei Chen, Nadine Norton, Lyudmila Georgieva, Murat Sari, Michael C. O'Donovan, Fikret Erdogan, Michael J. Owen, Hans Hilger Ropers, Reinhard Ullmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

301 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Copy number variations (CNVs) account for a substantial proportion of human genomic variation, and have been shown to cause neurodevelopmental disorders. We sought to determine the relevance of CNVs to the aetiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Whole-genome, high-resolution, tiling path BAC array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) was employed to test DNA from 93 individuals with DSM-IV SZ. Common DNA copy number changes that are unlikely to be directly pathogenic in SZ were filtered out by comparison to a reference dataset of 372 control individuals analyzed in our laboratory, and a screen against the Database of Genomic Variants. The remaining aberrations were validated with Affymetrix 250K SNP arrays or 244K Agilent oligo-arrays and tested for inheritance from the parents. A total of 13 aberrations satisfied our criteria. Two of them are very likely to be pathogenic. The first one is a deletion at 2p16.3 that was present in an affected sibling and disrupts NRXN1. The second one is a de novo duplication at 15q13.1 spanning APBA2. The proteins of these two genes interact directly and play a role in synaptic development and function. Both genes have been affected by CNVs in patients with autism and mental retardation, but neither has been previously implicated in SZ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-465
Number of pages8
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Schizophrenia
DNA Copy Number Variations
Autistic Disorder
Intellectual Disability
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Siblings
Parents
Genome
Databases
DNA
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Comparative genome hybridization suggests a role for NRXN1 and APBA2 in schizophrenia. / Kirov, George; Gumus, Dilihan; Chen, Wei; Norton, Nadine; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Sari, Murat; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Erdogan, Fikret; Owen, Michael J.; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Ullmann, Reinhard.

In: Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.02.2008, p. 458-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kirov, G, Gumus, D, Chen, W, Norton, N, Georgieva, L, Sari, M, O'Donovan, MC, Erdogan, F, Owen, MJ, Ropers, HH & Ullmann, R 2008, 'Comparative genome hybridization suggests a role for NRXN1 and APBA2 in schizophrenia', Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 458-465. https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddm323
Kirov, George ; Gumus, Dilihan ; Chen, Wei ; Norton, Nadine ; Georgieva, Lyudmila ; Sari, Murat ; O'Donovan, Michael C. ; Erdogan, Fikret ; Owen, Michael J. ; Ropers, Hans Hilger ; Ullmann, Reinhard. / Comparative genome hybridization suggests a role for NRXN1 and APBA2 in schizophrenia. In: Human Molecular Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 458-465.
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