Comparative analysis of acute toxicities and patient reported outcomes between intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer

Gohar S. Manzar, Scott C. Lester, David M. Routman, William S. Harmsen, Molly M. Petersen, Jeff A. Sloan, Daniel W. Mundy, Ashley E. Hunzeker, Adam C. Amundson, Jeffrey L. Anderson, Samir H. Patel, Yolanda I. Garces, Michele Y. Halyard, Lisa A. McGee, Michelle A. Neben-Wittich, Daniel J. Ma, Steven J. Frank, Thomas J. Whitaker, Robert L. Foote

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and purpose: IMPT improves normal tissue sparing compared to VMAT in treating oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Our aim was to assess if this translates into clinical benefits. Materials and methods: OPC patients treated with definitive or adjuvant IMPT or VMAT from 2013 to 2018 were included. All underwent prospective assessment using patient-reported-outcomes (PROs) (EORTC-QLQ-H&N35) and provider-assessed toxicities (CTCAEv4.03). End-of-treatment and pretreatment scores were compared. PEG-tube use, hospitalization, and narcotic use were retrospectively collected. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test with propensity matching for PROs/provider-assessed toxicities, and t-tests for other clinical outcomes. Results: 46 IMPT and 259 VMAT patients were included; median follow-up was 12 months (IMPT) and 30 months (VMAT). Baseline characteristics were balanced except for age (p = 0.04, IMPT were older) and smoking (p < 0.01, 10.9% IMPT >20PYs, 29.3% VMAT). IMPT was associated with lower PEG placement (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.12–0.59; p = 0.001) and less hospitalization ≤60 days post-RT (OR = 0.21; 95% CI:0.07–0.6, p < 0.001), with subgroup analysis revealing strongest benefits in patients treated definitively or with concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). IMPT was associated with a relative risk reduction of 22.3% for end-of-treatment narcotic use. Patients reported reduced cough and dysgeusia with IMPT (p < 0.05); patients treated definitively or with CRT also reported feeling less ill, reduced feeding tube use, and better swallow. Provider-assessed toxicities demonstrated less pain and mucositis with IMPT, but more mucosal infection. Conclusion: IMPT is associated with improved PROs, reduced PEG-tube placement, hospitalization, and narcotic requirements. Mucositis, dysphagia, and pain were decreased with IMPT. Benefits were predominantly seen in patients treated definitively or with CRT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-74
Number of pages11
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume147
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Acute toxicity
  • IMPT
  • Intensity modulated proton therapy
  • Oropharyngeal cancer
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Proton therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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    Manzar, G. S., Lester, S. C., Routman, D. M., Harmsen, W. S., Petersen, M. M., Sloan, J. A., Mundy, D. W., Hunzeker, A. E., Amundson, A. C., Anderson, J. L., Patel, S. H., Garces, Y. I., Halyard, M. Y., McGee, L. A., Neben-Wittich, M. A., Ma, D. J., Frank, S. J., Whitaker, T. J., & Foote, R. L. (2020). Comparative analysis of acute toxicities and patient reported outcomes between intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Radiotherapy and Oncology, 147, 64-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2020.03.010