Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus: Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life

Scott G. Houghton, Claude Deschamps, Stephen D. Cassivi, Mark S. Allen, Francis C. Nichols, Sunni A. Barnes, Peter C. Pairolero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Transabdominal gastroplasty for shortened esophagus at the time of fundoplication results in a segment of aperistaltic, acid-secreting neoesophagus above the fundoplication. We hypothesized that transabdominal gastroplasty impairs quality of life (QOL). Methods: This was a matched paired analysis with retrospective chart review and follow-up questionnaire of 116 patients undergoing transabdominal fundoplication with gastroplasty with 116 matched controls undergoing transabdominal fundoplication alone from January 1997 to June 2005. Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) and Quality Of Life in Reflux And Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) instruments were used to measure overall and reflux-related QOL. Overall response rate was 75%; including 65 matched pairs used for long-term follow-up and QOL analysis. Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, duration of hospitalization, and complications (p > 0.05). Gastroplasty patients had larger hiatal hernias and were more likely to have undergone a previous fundoplication (p < 0.01). No perioperative deaths or major morbidity occurred in 18% of both groups. Survey respondents were older than nonrespondents (p < 0.01). Complications did not impact response rates (p = 0.11). Median follow-up was 14 months in the gastroplasty group and 17 months in controls (p = 0.02). The groups had similar scores on the SF-36 and QOLRAD (p > 0.05) and similar overall frequency of patient satisfaction, perceived health status, and self-reported symptoms of reflux, dysphagia, bloating, diarrhea, and excessive flatus (p > 0.05). Control patients were more likely to require rehospitalization or reinterventions (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Transabdominal gastroplasty and fundoplication for shortened esophagus is safe and results in similar overall and reflux-related QOL compared with fundoplication alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1947-1952
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastroplasty
Fundoplication
Esophagus
Quality of Life
Flatulence
Hiatal Hernia
Dyspepsia
Deglutition Disorders
Health Surveys
Patient Satisfaction
Health Status
Diarrhea
Hospitalization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Houghton, S. G., Deschamps, C., Cassivi, S. D., Allen, M. S., Nichols, F. C., Barnes, S. A., & Pairolero, P. C. (2008). Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus: Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 85(6), 1947-1952. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.02.080

Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus : Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life. / Houghton, Scott G.; Deschamps, Claude; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Allen, Mark S.; Nichols, Francis C.; Barnes, Sunni A.; Pairolero, Peter C.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 85, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 1947-1952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Houghton, Scott G. ; Deschamps, Claude ; Cassivi, Stephen D. ; Allen, Mark S. ; Nichols, Francis C. ; Barnes, Sunni A. ; Pairolero, Peter C. / Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus : Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 1947-1952.
@article{1c8d1837d85740be985956c4ef3c0ceb,
title = "Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus: Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life",
abstract = "Background: Transabdominal gastroplasty for shortened esophagus at the time of fundoplication results in a segment of aperistaltic, acid-secreting neoesophagus above the fundoplication. We hypothesized that transabdominal gastroplasty impairs quality of life (QOL). Methods: This was a matched paired analysis with retrospective chart review and follow-up questionnaire of 116 patients undergoing transabdominal fundoplication with gastroplasty with 116 matched controls undergoing transabdominal fundoplication alone from January 1997 to June 2005. Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) and Quality Of Life in Reflux And Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) instruments were used to measure overall and reflux-related QOL. Overall response rate was 75{\%}; including 65 matched pairs used for long-term follow-up and QOL analysis. Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, duration of hospitalization, and complications (p > 0.05). Gastroplasty patients had larger hiatal hernias and were more likely to have undergone a previous fundoplication (p < 0.01). No perioperative deaths or major morbidity occurred in 18{\%} of both groups. Survey respondents were older than nonrespondents (p < 0.01). Complications did not impact response rates (p = 0.11). Median follow-up was 14 months in the gastroplasty group and 17 months in controls (p = 0.02). The groups had similar scores on the SF-36 and QOLRAD (p > 0.05) and similar overall frequency of patient satisfaction, perceived health status, and self-reported symptoms of reflux, dysphagia, bloating, diarrhea, and excessive flatus (p > 0.05). Control patients were more likely to require rehospitalization or reinterventions (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Transabdominal gastroplasty and fundoplication for shortened esophagus is safe and results in similar overall and reflux-related QOL compared with fundoplication alone.",
author = "Houghton, {Scott G.} and Claude Deschamps and Cassivi, {Stephen D.} and Allen, {Mark S.} and Nichols, {Francis C.} and Barnes, {Sunni A.} and Pairolero, {Peter C.}",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.02.080",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "1947--1952",
journal = "Annals of Thoracic Surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined Transabdominal Gastroplasty and Fundoplication for Shortened Esophagus

T2 - Impact on Reflux-Related and Overall Quality of Life

AU - Houghton, Scott G.

AU - Deschamps, Claude

AU - Cassivi, Stephen D.

AU - Allen, Mark S.

AU - Nichols, Francis C.

AU - Barnes, Sunni A.

AU - Pairolero, Peter C.

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - Background: Transabdominal gastroplasty for shortened esophagus at the time of fundoplication results in a segment of aperistaltic, acid-secreting neoesophagus above the fundoplication. We hypothesized that transabdominal gastroplasty impairs quality of life (QOL). Methods: This was a matched paired analysis with retrospective chart review and follow-up questionnaire of 116 patients undergoing transabdominal fundoplication with gastroplasty with 116 matched controls undergoing transabdominal fundoplication alone from January 1997 to June 2005. Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) and Quality Of Life in Reflux And Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) instruments were used to measure overall and reflux-related QOL. Overall response rate was 75%; including 65 matched pairs used for long-term follow-up and QOL analysis. Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, duration of hospitalization, and complications (p > 0.05). Gastroplasty patients had larger hiatal hernias and were more likely to have undergone a previous fundoplication (p < 0.01). No perioperative deaths or major morbidity occurred in 18% of both groups. Survey respondents were older than nonrespondents (p < 0.01). Complications did not impact response rates (p = 0.11). Median follow-up was 14 months in the gastroplasty group and 17 months in controls (p = 0.02). The groups had similar scores on the SF-36 and QOLRAD (p > 0.05) and similar overall frequency of patient satisfaction, perceived health status, and self-reported symptoms of reflux, dysphagia, bloating, diarrhea, and excessive flatus (p > 0.05). Control patients were more likely to require rehospitalization or reinterventions (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Transabdominal gastroplasty and fundoplication for shortened esophagus is safe and results in similar overall and reflux-related QOL compared with fundoplication alone.

AB - Background: Transabdominal gastroplasty for shortened esophagus at the time of fundoplication results in a segment of aperistaltic, acid-secreting neoesophagus above the fundoplication. We hypothesized that transabdominal gastroplasty impairs quality of life (QOL). Methods: This was a matched paired analysis with retrospective chart review and follow-up questionnaire of 116 patients undergoing transabdominal fundoplication with gastroplasty with 116 matched controls undergoing transabdominal fundoplication alone from January 1997 to June 2005. Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) and Quality Of Life in Reflux And Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) instruments were used to measure overall and reflux-related QOL. Overall response rate was 75%; including 65 matched pairs used for long-term follow-up and QOL analysis. Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, duration of hospitalization, and complications (p > 0.05). Gastroplasty patients had larger hiatal hernias and were more likely to have undergone a previous fundoplication (p < 0.01). No perioperative deaths or major morbidity occurred in 18% of both groups. Survey respondents were older than nonrespondents (p < 0.01). Complications did not impact response rates (p = 0.11). Median follow-up was 14 months in the gastroplasty group and 17 months in controls (p = 0.02). The groups had similar scores on the SF-36 and QOLRAD (p > 0.05) and similar overall frequency of patient satisfaction, perceived health status, and self-reported symptoms of reflux, dysphagia, bloating, diarrhea, and excessive flatus (p > 0.05). Control patients were more likely to require rehospitalization or reinterventions (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Transabdominal gastroplasty and fundoplication for shortened esophagus is safe and results in similar overall and reflux-related QOL compared with fundoplication alone.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43649095794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43649095794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.02.080

DO - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2008.02.080

M3 - Article

C2 - 18498800

AN - SCOPUS:43649095794

VL - 85

SP - 1947

EP - 1952

JO - Annals of Thoracic Surgery

JF - Annals of Thoracic Surgery

SN - 0003-4975

IS - 6

ER -