Combined I-124 positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of NIS gene expression in animal models of stably transfected and intravenously transfected tumor

David Dingli, Brad J. Kemp, Michael K. O'Connor, John C. Morris, Stephen J. Russell, Val J. Lowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: With the advent of replication competent viruses for cancer gene therapy, it has become imperative to monitor the biodistribution, expression and replication of these vectors in living organisms. We evaluated the potential of I-124 positron emission tomography (PET)/ computed tomography (CT) imaging in gene therapy animal models utilizing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and compared the findings to I-123 gamma camera imaging. Procedures: CB17 SCID mice were implanted with myeloma cell lines expressing NIS or infected by MV-NIS given systemically. Mice were imaged by both gamma camera (I-123) and PET/CT (I-124) and image quality assessed. Results: NIS expressing tumors concentrated 7.1% of the injected activity while tumors infected with the control virus had only 0.3% of the activity injected. Conclusions: I-124 PET/CT in combination with NIS allows the tracking of stably transfected tumors or intravenously transfected tumors. Combined modality imaging using PET/CT allows accurate and non-invasive imaging of the distribution and gene expression of a replicating viral vector in living systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-23
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Imaging and Biology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

Keywords

  • Computerized tomography
  • Gamma camera
  • Isotopes
  • Measles virus
  • Molecular imaging
  • Oncolysis
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Sodium iodide symporter
  • Virotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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