Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents

Data from a national survey

Amy S. Oxentenko, Nisheeth K. Goel, Darrell S. Pardi, Robert A. Vierkant, Wesley O. Petersen, Joseph C. Kolars, Robert T. Flinchbaugh, Timothy O. Wilson, Katherine Sharpe, John H. Bond, Robert A. Smith, Bernard Levin, J. Bart Pope, Paul C. Schroy, Paul John Limburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. We conducted a national survey of CRC screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among resident physicians in Family Practice (FP), Internal Medicine (IM), and Obstetrics & Gynecology (OB/GYN) training programs. Methods. Directors/administrators from 1085 FP, IM, and OB/GYN training programs were contacted by e-mail with a request to forward an invitation to participate in our Web-based CRC screening education survey to all residents in their program. Willing residents submitted responses in anonymous fashion. Data were analyzed using χ2 tests and analysis of variance methods. Results. In total, 243 program directors/administrators forwarded our invitation, and 835 residents responded (384 FP, 266 IM, 177 OB/GYN, 8 undesignated specialty). Nearly all resident responders (89%) had received CRC screening education, but few content delivery methods were reported. Most felt at least somewhat comfortable or somewhat knowledgeable with respect to advising patients about CRC screening (90%), currently endorsed CRC screening guidelines (89%), and criteria used to identify familial CRC syndromes (50%). However, substantially fewer respondents reported feeling very comfortable or very knowledgeable in these areas (45%, 23%, and 5%, respectively). Program specialty, level of training, and gender were the strongest indicators of self-perceived preparedness. Conclusions. Although based on a relatively small sample of all FP, IM, and OB/GYN residents, these data suggest tangible opportunities to improve the CRC screening curriculum in primary care residency programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-218
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume22
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Primary Health Care
Education
Family Practice
Internal Medicine
Administrative Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires
Postal Service
Internship and Residency
Gynecology
Curriculum
Obstetrics
Analysis of Variance
Emotions
Guidelines
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

Cite this

Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents : Data from a national survey. / Oxentenko, Amy S.; Goel, Nisheeth K.; Pardi, Darrell S.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Kolars, Joseph C.; Flinchbaugh, Robert T.; Wilson, Timothy O.; Sharpe, Katherine; Bond, John H.; Smith, Robert A.; Levin, Bernard; Pope, J. Bart; Schroy, Paul C.; Limburg, Paul John.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 22, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 208-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oxentenko, AS, Goel, NK, Pardi, DS, Vierkant, RA, Petersen, WO, Kolars, JC, Flinchbaugh, RT, Wilson, TO, Sharpe, K, Bond, JH, Smith, RA, Levin, B, Pope, JB, Schroy, PC & Limburg, PJ 2007, 'Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents: Data from a national survey', Journal of Cancer Education, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 208-218.
Oxentenko, Amy S. ; Goel, Nisheeth K. ; Pardi, Darrell S. ; Vierkant, Robert A. ; Petersen, Wesley O. ; Kolars, Joseph C. ; Flinchbaugh, Robert T. ; Wilson, Timothy O. ; Sharpe, Katherine ; Bond, John H. ; Smith, Robert A. ; Levin, Bernard ; Pope, J. Bart ; Schroy, Paul C. ; Limburg, Paul John. / Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents : Data from a national survey. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 208-218.
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title = "Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents: Data from a national survey",
abstract = "Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. We conducted a national survey of CRC screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among resident physicians in Family Practice (FP), Internal Medicine (IM), and Obstetrics & Gynecology (OB/GYN) training programs. Methods. Directors/administrators from 1085 FP, IM, and OB/GYN training programs were contacted by e-mail with a request to forward an invitation to participate in our Web-based CRC screening education survey to all residents in their program. Willing residents submitted responses in anonymous fashion. Data were analyzed using χ2 tests and analysis of variance methods. Results. In total, 243 program directors/administrators forwarded our invitation, and 835 residents responded (384 FP, 266 IM, 177 OB/GYN, 8 undesignated specialty). Nearly all resident responders (89{\%}) had received CRC screening education, but few content delivery methods were reported. Most felt at least somewhat comfortable or somewhat knowledgeable with respect to advising patients about CRC screening (90{\%}), currently endorsed CRC screening guidelines (89{\%}), and criteria used to identify familial CRC syndromes (50{\%}). However, substantially fewer respondents reported feeling very comfortable or very knowledgeable in these areas (45{\%}, 23{\%}, and 5{\%}, respectively). Program specialty, level of training, and gender were the strongest indicators of self-perceived preparedness. Conclusions. Although based on a relatively small sample of all FP, IM, and OB/GYN residents, these data suggest tangible opportunities to improve the CRC screening curriculum in primary care residency programs.",
author = "Oxentenko, {Amy S.} and Goel, {Nisheeth K.} and Pardi, {Darrell S.} and Vierkant, {Robert A.} and Petersen, {Wesley O.} and Kolars, {Joseph C.} and Flinchbaugh, {Robert T.} and Wilson, {Timothy O.} and Katherine Sharpe and Bond, {John H.} and Smith, {Robert A.} and Bernard Levin and Pope, {J. Bart} and Schroy, {Paul C.} and Limburg, {Paul John}",
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T1 - Colorectal cancer screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among primary care residents

T2 - Data from a national survey

AU - Oxentenko, Amy S.

AU - Goel, Nisheeth K.

AU - Pardi, Darrell S.

AU - Vierkant, Robert A.

AU - Petersen, Wesley O.

AU - Kolars, Joseph C.

AU - Flinchbaugh, Robert T.

AU - Wilson, Timothy O.

AU - Sharpe, Katherine

AU - Bond, John H.

AU - Smith, Robert A.

AU - Levin, Bernard

AU - Pope, J. Bart

AU - Schroy, Paul C.

AU - Limburg, Paul John

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. We conducted a national survey of CRC screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among resident physicians in Family Practice (FP), Internal Medicine (IM), and Obstetrics & Gynecology (OB/GYN) training programs. Methods. Directors/administrators from 1085 FP, IM, and OB/GYN training programs were contacted by e-mail with a request to forward an invitation to participate in our Web-based CRC screening education survey to all residents in their program. Willing residents submitted responses in anonymous fashion. Data were analyzed using χ2 tests and analysis of variance methods. Results. In total, 243 program directors/administrators forwarded our invitation, and 835 residents responded (384 FP, 266 IM, 177 OB/GYN, 8 undesignated specialty). Nearly all resident responders (89%) had received CRC screening education, but few content delivery methods were reported. Most felt at least somewhat comfortable or somewhat knowledgeable with respect to advising patients about CRC screening (90%), currently endorsed CRC screening guidelines (89%), and criteria used to identify familial CRC syndromes (50%). However, substantially fewer respondents reported feeling very comfortable or very knowledgeable in these areas (45%, 23%, and 5%, respectively). Program specialty, level of training, and gender were the strongest indicators of self-perceived preparedness. Conclusions. Although based on a relatively small sample of all FP, IM, and OB/GYN residents, these data suggest tangible opportunities to improve the CRC screening curriculum in primary care residency programs.

AB - Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. We conducted a national survey of CRC screening education, prioritization, and self-perceived preparedness among resident physicians in Family Practice (FP), Internal Medicine (IM), and Obstetrics & Gynecology (OB/GYN) training programs. Methods. Directors/administrators from 1085 FP, IM, and OB/GYN training programs were contacted by e-mail with a request to forward an invitation to participate in our Web-based CRC screening education survey to all residents in their program. Willing residents submitted responses in anonymous fashion. Data were analyzed using χ2 tests and analysis of variance methods. Results. In total, 243 program directors/administrators forwarded our invitation, and 835 residents responded (384 FP, 266 IM, 177 OB/GYN, 8 undesignated specialty). Nearly all resident responders (89%) had received CRC screening education, but few content delivery methods were reported. Most felt at least somewhat comfortable or somewhat knowledgeable with respect to advising patients about CRC screening (90%), currently endorsed CRC screening guidelines (89%), and criteria used to identify familial CRC syndromes (50%). However, substantially fewer respondents reported feeling very comfortable or very knowledgeable in these areas (45%, 23%, and 5%, respectively). Program specialty, level of training, and gender were the strongest indicators of self-perceived preparedness. Conclusions. Although based on a relatively small sample of all FP, IM, and OB/GYN residents, these data suggest tangible opportunities to improve the CRC screening curriculum in primary care residency programs.

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