Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms

David A. Lieberman, Patricia L. De Garmo, David E. Fleischer, Glenn M. Eisen, Benjamin K S Chan, Mark Helfand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of colonic polyps or masses 1 cm or greater in diameter in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, from diverse practice settings, using a national endoscopic database. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were included based on procedure indication. Endoscopic data were generated with a computer database at each practice site, transmitted to a central data bank and merged with data from multiple sites for analysis. Group 1 patients had nonspecific abdominal symptoms, which were defined as pain, constipation and diarrhea. Group 2 patients had a positive fecal occult blood test. Group 3 patients were asymptomatic, undergoing screening colonoscopy. Serious colon pathology was defined as a polyp or mass greater than 9 mm in size. Results: Data were collected from 31 practice sites in 21 states during a period of 18 months. Of the 20,745 colonoscopy examinations, 9.2% were performed to evaluate patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, excluding other indications. Among patients with nonspecific symptoms 7.27% had polyp(s) 1 cm or greater in diameter compared with 17.05% of patients with positive fecal occult blood test (odds ratio 2.12: CI [1.73, 2.60]; p < 0.001). Patients with nonspecific symptoms had similar rates of large polyps as asymptomatic patients (7.27% vs. 6.45%, p = 0.32). Multivariate analysis identified several independent variables including increasing age, male gender and practice site at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Conclusions: In diverse, practice-based settings, patients with nonspecifiC abdominal symptoms who are referred for colonoscopy do not have a higher risk of serious colonic pathology than asymptomatic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-651
Number of pages5
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume51
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Colonoscopy
Polyps
Occult Blood
Hematologic Tests
Databases
Colonic Polyps
Pathology
Veterans
Constipation
Diarrhea
Colon
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lieberman, D. A., De Garmo, P. L., Fleischer, D. E., Eisen, G. M., Chan, B. K. S., & Helfand, M. (2000). Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 51(6), 647-651.

Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms. / Lieberman, David A.; De Garmo, Patricia L.; Fleischer, David E.; Eisen, Glenn M.; Chan, Benjamin K S; Helfand, Mark.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 51, No. 6, 2000, p. 647-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lieberman, DA, De Garmo, PL, Fleischer, DE, Eisen, GM, Chan, BKS & Helfand, M 2000, 'Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms', Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 647-651.
Lieberman DA, De Garmo PL, Fleischer DE, Eisen GM, Chan BKS, Helfand M. Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2000;51(6):647-651.
Lieberman, David A. ; De Garmo, Patricia L. ; Fleischer, David E. ; Eisen, Glenn M. ; Chan, Benjamin K S ; Helfand, Mark. / Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2000 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 647-651.
@article{680ff83f82b041deb8bb36284e06b982,
title = "Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of colonic polyps or masses 1 cm or greater in diameter in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, from diverse practice settings, using a national endoscopic database. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were included based on procedure indication. Endoscopic data were generated with a computer database at each practice site, transmitted to a central data bank and merged with data from multiple sites for analysis. Group 1 patients had nonspecific abdominal symptoms, which were defined as pain, constipation and diarrhea. Group 2 patients had a positive fecal occult blood test. Group 3 patients were asymptomatic, undergoing screening colonoscopy. Serious colon pathology was defined as a polyp or mass greater than 9 mm in size. Results: Data were collected from 31 practice sites in 21 states during a period of 18 months. Of the 20,745 colonoscopy examinations, 9.2{\%} were performed to evaluate patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, excluding other indications. Among patients with nonspecific symptoms 7.27{\%} had polyp(s) 1 cm or greater in diameter compared with 17.05{\%} of patients with positive fecal occult blood test (odds ratio 2.12: CI [1.73, 2.60]; p < 0.001). Patients with nonspecific symptoms had similar rates of large polyps as asymptomatic patients (7.27{\%} vs. 6.45{\%}, p = 0.32). Multivariate analysis identified several independent variables including increasing age, male gender and practice site at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Conclusions: In diverse, practice-based settings, patients with nonspecifiC abdominal symptoms who are referred for colonoscopy do not have a higher risk of serious colonic pathology than asymptomatic patients.",
author = "Lieberman, {David A.} and {De Garmo}, {Patricia L.} and Fleischer, {David E.} and Eisen, {Glenn M.} and Chan, {Benjamin K S} and Mark Helfand",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "647--651",
journal = "Gastrointestinal Endoscopy",
issn = "0016-5107",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colonic neoplasia in patients with nonspecific GI symptoms

AU - Lieberman, David A.

AU - De Garmo, Patricia L.

AU - Fleischer, David E.

AU - Eisen, Glenn M.

AU - Chan, Benjamin K S

AU - Helfand, Mark

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of colonic polyps or masses 1 cm or greater in diameter in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, from diverse practice settings, using a national endoscopic database. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were included based on procedure indication. Endoscopic data were generated with a computer database at each practice site, transmitted to a central data bank and merged with data from multiple sites for analysis. Group 1 patients had nonspecific abdominal symptoms, which were defined as pain, constipation and diarrhea. Group 2 patients had a positive fecal occult blood test. Group 3 patients were asymptomatic, undergoing screening colonoscopy. Serious colon pathology was defined as a polyp or mass greater than 9 mm in size. Results: Data were collected from 31 practice sites in 21 states during a period of 18 months. Of the 20,745 colonoscopy examinations, 9.2% were performed to evaluate patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, excluding other indications. Among patients with nonspecific symptoms 7.27% had polyp(s) 1 cm or greater in diameter compared with 17.05% of patients with positive fecal occult blood test (odds ratio 2.12: CI [1.73, 2.60]; p < 0.001). Patients with nonspecific symptoms had similar rates of large polyps as asymptomatic patients (7.27% vs. 6.45%, p = 0.32). Multivariate analysis identified several independent variables including increasing age, male gender and practice site at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Conclusions: In diverse, practice-based settings, patients with nonspecifiC abdominal symptoms who are referred for colonoscopy do not have a higher risk of serious colonic pathology than asymptomatic patients.

AB - Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of colonic polyps or masses 1 cm or greater in diameter in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, from diverse practice settings, using a national endoscopic database. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy were included based on procedure indication. Endoscopic data were generated with a computer database at each practice site, transmitted to a central data bank and merged with data from multiple sites for analysis. Group 1 patients had nonspecific abdominal symptoms, which were defined as pain, constipation and diarrhea. Group 2 patients had a positive fecal occult blood test. Group 3 patients were asymptomatic, undergoing screening colonoscopy. Serious colon pathology was defined as a polyp or mass greater than 9 mm in size. Results: Data were collected from 31 practice sites in 21 states during a period of 18 months. Of the 20,745 colonoscopy examinations, 9.2% were performed to evaluate patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, excluding other indications. Among patients with nonspecific symptoms 7.27% had polyp(s) 1 cm or greater in diameter compared with 17.05% of patients with positive fecal occult blood test (odds ratio 2.12: CI [1.73, 2.60]; p < 0.001). Patients with nonspecific symptoms had similar rates of large polyps as asymptomatic patients (7.27% vs. 6.45%, p = 0.32). Multivariate analysis identified several independent variables including increasing age, male gender and practice site at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Conclusions: In diverse, practice-based settings, patients with nonspecifiC abdominal symptoms who are referred for colonoscopy do not have a higher risk of serious colonic pathology than asymptomatic patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034096327&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034096327&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10840294

AN - SCOPUS:0034096327

VL - 51

SP - 647

EP - 651

JO - Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

JF - Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

SN - 0016-5107

IS - 6

ER -