Cognitive outcomes of patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

Jennifer E. Fugate, Samuel A. Moore, David S Knopman, Daniel O. Claassen, Eelco F M Wijdicks, Roger D. White, Alejandro Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to study the long-term cognitive abilities of patients surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Methods: We prospectively identified and examined consecutive survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who underwent TH at our institution from June 2006 to May 2011. The results of brain imaging, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) measurements, and EEGs were recorded. We assessed cognitive domains using the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. An education-Adjusted score of 32 was considered normal. Results: Of 133 total patients, 77 (58%) were alive at a median follow-up of 20 months (interquartile range 14-24 months). We interviewed 56 patients (73% of those alive). Median age was 67 years (range 24-88 years). Fifty-one patients (91%) were living independently. Modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status scores ranged from 16 to 41. Thirty-three (60%) were considered cognitively normal and 22 (40%) were cognitively impaired. The time to assessment did not differ among the cognitive outcomes (p 5 0.557). The median duration of coma was 2 days, possibly indicating that patients with severe anoxic injury were not included. Eighteen patients were not working at the time of their cardiac arrest (17 were retired and 1 was unemployed). Of the 38 patients who were working up to the time of the cardiac arrest, 30 (79%) returned to work. Cognitive outcome was not associated with age, time to return of spontaneous circulation, brain atrophy, or leukoaraiosis. Conclusions: The majority of surviving patients who underwent TH after cardiac arrest in this series had preserved cognitive function and were able to return to work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-45
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2013

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Induced Hypothermia
Heart Arrest
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Leukoaraiosis
Interviews
Return to Work
Therapeutics
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Coma
Neuroimaging
Cognition
Atrophy
Survivors
Electroencephalography
Education
Wounds and Injuries
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cognitive outcomes of patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. / Fugate, Jennifer E.; Moore, Samuel A.; Knopman, David S; Claassen, Daniel O.; Wijdicks, Eelco F M; White, Roger D.; Rabinstein, Alejandro.

In: Neurology, Vol. 81, No. 1, 02.07.2013, p. 40-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fugate, Jennifer E. ; Moore, Samuel A. ; Knopman, David S ; Claassen, Daniel O. ; Wijdicks, Eelco F M ; White, Roger D. ; Rabinstein, Alejandro. / Cognitive outcomes of patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. In: Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 40-45.
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