Coccidioidal pneumonia, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2000-2004

Michelle M. Kim, Janis E. Blair, Elizabeth J. Carey, Qing Wu, Jerry D. Smilack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) often results in severe illness and death. In large, geographically defined areas where Coccidioides spp. are endemic, coccidioidomycosis is a recognized cause of CAP, but its frequency has not been studied extensively. To determine the frequency of patients with coccidioidomycosis, we conducted a prospective evaluation of 59 patients with CAP in the Phoenix, Arizona, area. Of 35 for whom paired coccidioidal serologic testing was performed, 6 (17%) had evidence of acute coccidioidomycosis. Coccidioidal pneumonia was more likely than noncoccidioidal CAP to produce rash. The following were not found to be risk factors or reliable predictors of infection: demographic features, underlying medical conditions, duration of time spent in disease-endemic areas, occupational and recreational activities, initial laboratory studies, and chest radiography findings. Coccidioidomycosis is a common cause of CAP in our patient population. In the absence of distinguishing clinical features, coccidioidal pneumonia can be identified only with appropriate laboratory studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-401
Number of pages5
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Pneumonia
Coccidioidomycosis
Coccidioides
Endemic Diseases
Exanthema
Radiography
Thorax
Demography
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Kim, M. M., Blair, J. E., Carey, E. J., Wu, Q., & Smilack, J. D. (2009). Coccidioidal pneumonia, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2000-2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(3), 397-401. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081007

Coccidioidal pneumonia, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2000-2004. / Kim, Michelle M.; Blair, Janis E.; Carey, Elizabeth J.; Wu, Qing; Smilack, Jerry D.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 15, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 397-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, MM, Blair, JE, Carey, EJ, Wu, Q & Smilack, JD 2009, 'Coccidioidal pneumonia, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2000-2004', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 397-401. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1503.081007
Kim, Michelle M. ; Blair, Janis E. ; Carey, Elizabeth J. ; Wu, Qing ; Smilack, Jerry D. / Coccidioidal pneumonia, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2000-2004. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 397-401.
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