Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Wengian Hu, Thomas J. Sweet, Sangpen Chamnongpol, Kristian E. Baker, Jeff Coller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

195 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rates of RNA decay and transcription determine the steady-state levels of all messenger RNA and both can be subject to regulation. Although the details of transcriptional regulation are becoming increasingly understood, the mechanism(s) controlling mRNA decay remain unclear. In yeast, a major pathway of mRNA decay begins with deadenylation followed by decapping and 5′ĝ€"3′ exonuclease digestion. Importantly, it is hypothesized that ribosomes must be removed from mRNA before transcripts are destroyed. Contrary to this prediction, here we show that decay takes place while mRNAs are associated with actively translating ribosomes. The data indicate that dissociation of ribosomes from mRNA is not a prerequisite for decay and we suggest that the 5′ĝ€"3′ polarity of mRNA degradation has evolved to ensure that the last translocating ribosome can complete translation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-229
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume461
Issue number7261
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2009
Externally publishedYes

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RNA Stability
Ribosomes
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Messenger RNA
Exonucleases
Digestion
Yeasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hu, W., Sweet, T. J., Chamnongpol, S., Baker, K. E., & Coller, J. (2009). Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nature, 461(7261), 225-229. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08265

Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. / Hu, Wengian; Sweet, Thomas J.; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Baker, Kristian E.; Coller, Jeff.

In: Nature, Vol. 461, No. 7261, 10.09.2009, p. 225-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, W, Sweet, TJ, Chamnongpol, S, Baker, KE & Coller, J 2009, 'Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae', Nature, vol. 461, no. 7261, pp. 225-229. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08265
Hu W, Sweet TJ, Chamnongpol S, Baker KE, Coller J. Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nature. 2009 Sep 10;461(7261):225-229. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature08265
Hu, Wengian ; Sweet, Thomas J. ; Chamnongpol, Sangpen ; Baker, Kristian E. ; Coller, Jeff. / Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In: Nature. 2009 ; Vol. 461, No. 7261. pp. 225-229.
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