Clonal analysis via barcoding reveals diverse growth and differentiation of transplanted mouse and human mammary stem cells

Long V. Nguyen, Maisam Makarem, Annaick Carles, Michelle Moksa, Nagarajan Kannan, Pawan Pandoh, Peter Eirew, Tomo Osako, Melanie Kardel, Alice M.S. Cheung, William Kennedy, Kane Tse, Thomas Zeng, Yongjun Zhao, R. Keith Humphries, Samuel Aparicio, Connie J. Eaves, Martin Hirst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular barcoding offers a powerful approach to characterize the growth and differentiation activity of large numbers of cotransplanted stem cells. Here, we describe a lentiviral genomic-barcoding and analysis strategy and its use to compare the clonal outputs of transplants of purified mouse and human basal mammary epithelial cells. We found that both sources of transplanted cells produced many bilineage mammary epithelial clones in primary recipients, although primary clones containing only one detectable mammary lineage were also common. Interestingly, regardless of the species of origin, many clones evident in secondary recipients were not detected in the primary hosts, and others that were changed from appearing luminal-restricted to appearing bilineage. This barcoding methodology has thus revealed conservation between mice and humans of a previously unknown diversity in the growth and differentiation activities of their basal mammary epithelial cells stimulated to grow in transplanted hosts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-263
Number of pages11
JournalCell Stem Cell
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 6 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Breast
Stem Cells
Clone Cells
Growth
Epithelial Cells
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Clonal analysis via barcoding reveals diverse growth and differentiation of transplanted mouse and human mammary stem cells. / Nguyen, Long V.; Makarem, Maisam; Carles, Annaick; Moksa, Michelle; Kannan, Nagarajan; Pandoh, Pawan; Eirew, Peter; Osako, Tomo; Kardel, Melanie; Cheung, Alice M.S.; Kennedy, William; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Humphries, R. Keith; Aparicio, Samuel; Eaves, Connie J.; Hirst, Martin.

In: Cell Stem Cell, Vol. 14, No. 2, 06.02.2014, p. 253-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, LV, Makarem, M, Carles, A, Moksa, M, Kannan, N, Pandoh, P, Eirew, P, Osako, T, Kardel, M, Cheung, AMS, Kennedy, W, Tse, K, Zeng, T, Zhao, Y, Humphries, RK, Aparicio, S, Eaves, CJ & Hirst, M 2014, 'Clonal analysis via barcoding reveals diverse growth and differentiation of transplanted mouse and human mammary stem cells', Cell Stem Cell, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 253-263. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2013.12.011
Nguyen, Long V. ; Makarem, Maisam ; Carles, Annaick ; Moksa, Michelle ; Kannan, Nagarajan ; Pandoh, Pawan ; Eirew, Peter ; Osako, Tomo ; Kardel, Melanie ; Cheung, Alice M.S. ; Kennedy, William ; Tse, Kane ; Zeng, Thomas ; Zhao, Yongjun ; Humphries, R. Keith ; Aparicio, Samuel ; Eaves, Connie J. ; Hirst, Martin. / Clonal analysis via barcoding reveals diverse growth and differentiation of transplanted mouse and human mammary stem cells. In: Cell Stem Cell. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 253-263.
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