Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas: An overview

Jennifer E. Fugate, Giuseppe Lanzino, Alejandro Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), the most common type of spinal cord vascular malformation, can be a challenge to diagnose and treat promptly. The disorder is rare, and the presenting clinical symptoms and signs are nonspecific and insidious at onset. Spinal dural AVFs preferentially affect middle-aged men, and patients most commonly present with gait abnormality or lower-extremity weakness and sensory disturbances. Symptoms gradually progress or decline in a stepwise manner and are commonly associated with pain and sphincter disturbances. Surgical or endovascular disconnection of the fistula has a high success rate with a low rate of morbidity. Motor symptoms are most likely to improve after treatment, followed by sensory disturbances, and lastly sphincter disturbances. Patients with severe neurological deficits at presentation tend to have worse posttreatment functional outcomes than those with mild or moderate pretreatment disability. However, improvement or stabilization of symptoms is seen in the vast majority of treated patients, and thus treatment is justified even in patients with substantial neurological deficits. The extent of intramedullary spinal cord T2 signal abnormality does not correlate with outcomes and should not be used as a prognostic factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE17
JournalNeurosurgical Focus
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations
Spinal Cord
Vascular Malformations
Gait
Signs and Symptoms
Fistula
Lower Extremity
Morbidity
Pain
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Central nervous system vascular malformation
  • Dural arteriovenous fistula
  • Spinal cord disease
  • Spinal cord ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas : An overview. / Fugate, Jennifer E.; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Rabinstein, Alejandro.

In: Neurosurgical Focus, Vol. 32, No. 5, E17, 05.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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