Clinical manifestations of lung cancer

A. M. Patel, S. G. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The initial clinical manifestations of lung cancer are diverse and may occur with or without symptoms. Manifestations of pulmonary malignant lesions are produced by local growth or invasion, metastatic disease, or paraneoplastic processes. Patterns of local invasion such as Pancoast's syndrome or the superior vena cava syndrome are relatively uncommon but well recognized. Metastatic lung cancer can involve almost any anatomic area by hematogenous, lymphatic, or, occasionally, interalveolar dissemination. Complications related to malnutrition, infection, electrolyte disturbances, and coexisting diseases influence the initial manifestations. Although individual tumor cell types are associated with characteristic features, no constellation of findings is pathognomonic for a specific histologic variant. Because successful treatment of pulmonary carcinoma depends on early detection, awareness of the typical clinical manifestations is important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-277
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume68
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lung Neoplasms
Pancoast Syndrome
Superior Vena Cava Syndrome
Lung
Malnutrition
Electrolytes
Carcinoma
Growth
Infection
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patel, A. M., & Peters, S. G. (1993). Clinical manifestations of lung cancer. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 68(3), 273-277.

Clinical manifestations of lung cancer. / Patel, A. M.; Peters, S. G.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 68, No. 3, 1993, p. 273-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, AM & Peters, SG 1993, 'Clinical manifestations of lung cancer', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 68, no. 3, pp. 273-277.
Patel AM, Peters SG. Clinical manifestations of lung cancer. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1993;68(3):273-277.
Patel, A. M. ; Peters, S. G. / Clinical manifestations of lung cancer. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1993 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 273-277.
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